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  • Hypothyroidism - Animation

    Hypothyroidism

    Animation

  • Hypothyroidism - Animation

    Do you feel tired and weak? Well, there could be many reasons for that, but a slow, underactive thyroid may be your problem. Let's talk about hypothyroidism - also known as Slow Thyroid. Here's the thyroid. It's this butterfly shaped gland in your neck - just below the voice box. The thyroid gland is known as the "master gland" of the body. It regulates our metabolism, so we don't act slow, like turtles, or fast, like jackrabbits. This gland releases hormones that control many important things, like helping your heart pump blood, stimulating your brain and muscles, and helping you keep your body at a healthy temperature. When you have hypothyroidism, your thyroid gland does not make enough hormone, so you end up feeling a bit slow, and perhaps cold, like the turtle. So, what causes a slow thyroid?For at least 9 out of 10 folks, the cause is something called Hashimoto's thyroiditis -- It's what we call an "autoimmune condition", where, for reasons that we don't quite understand, our own body attacks perfectly good thyroid tissue as though it were a foreign invader. This attack damages the thyroid gland, so much, that it can't put out enough hormone. This attack happens much more often in women than in men, 10 and 20 times more often. Also, some women develop this condition soon after pregnancy, Why that happens? Nobody knows for sure!So, how do you feel if you have a slow thyroid?If it's just mildly slow, you might not feel anything at all, that's called subclinical hypothyroidism. On the other hand, you might be experiencing symptoms of a slow thyroid RIGHT NOW, but you just haven't connected the dots. You might have mild fatigue, memory or concentration problems. You may have a decreased sex drive, or have trouble losing weight. If you have hypothyroidism, the main treatment is to use a synthetic form of T4 hormone, called Levothyroxine, that simply replaces what your body isn't producing. After starting hormone replacement, your hormone levels should be checked about every 6 weeks, to make sure you are maintaining normal levels. It's important to remember that treating hypothyroidism does not cure the problem, it only controls it. And once you're on Thyroid hormone replacement, you're probably on it for life. The good news is that once your thyroid situation is properly regulated, you'll probably feel a whole lot better.

  • Hyperthyroidism - Animation

    Hyperthyroidism

    Animation

  • Hyperthyroidism - Animation

    You're restless and nervous. You feel hungry all the time, but no matter how much you eat, you keep losing weight. You can't sleep or concentrate, and you feel hot and sweaty. If symptoms like these are putting you on edge, the problem may be an overactive thyroid gland, or hyperthyroidism. This little butterfly-shaped structure in your neck is your thyroid gland. It's job is to release the hormones that help control your body's energy levels, a process known as metabolism. When you have hyperthyroidism, that little gland goes into overdrive, releasing too much of its hormones. Having too much thyroid hormone is like putting your body in fast forward, everything speeds up. That's why you feel shaky, hungry, and your heart feels like it's pounding. So, what causes hyperthyroidism?You can develop an overactive thyroid because you've gotten too much iodine, an element the thyroid uses to make its hormones. Or, you might have a growth on your thyroid that's causing the excess hormone production. But many people with hyperthyroidism have an autoimmune disorder called Graves disease, which also makes their eyes bulge out. During an exam, your doctor may notice that your thyroid is larger than normal, and that you have high blood pressure, tremors, or a fast heart rate. These can all be signs of hypothyroidism. You'll probably have a blood test to check the levels of your thyroid hormones. If you do have an overactive thyroid, you may need to take medicine to slow down the gland and its hormone production. Or, your doctor may suggest having surgery to remove some or all of the thyroid, or taking radioactive iodine to destroy it. If you have surgery or radioactive iodine treatment, you'll probably need to take thyroid hormones for the rest of your life to replace the ones your body can no longer make. You can't prevent hyperthyroidism, but once you have it, it's usually pretty easy to treat. With the right treatment you can finally be free from its symptoms. While you're being treated, watch out for an emergency condition called thyroid crisis, or thyroid storm, which can set in if you've been under a lot of stress or have an infection. If you have a fever, fast and unsteady heartbeat, or you feel less alert than usual, call your emergency services number or go to the ER right away.

  • Thyroid gland biopsy

    Thyroid gland biopsy

    The thyroid is a gland located in the neck. It is a part of the endocrine (hormone) system, and plays a major role in regulating the body's metabolism. If a sample of cells is needed from the thyroid gland a fine needle biopsy can be performed. During this procedure, a skinny needle is inserted into the thyroid gland, and a sample of thyroid cells and fluid is drawn into the needle. The needle is then withdrawn and the cells are sent for examination. This test is usually performed to diagnose thyroid disease or thyroid cancer.

    Thyroid gland biopsy

    illustration

  • Thyroid uptake test

    Thyroid uptake test

    Radioactive iodine uptake test is a type of nuclear test performed to evaluate thyroid function. The patient ingests radioactive iodine (I-123 or I-131) capsules or liquid. After a time (usually 6 and 24-hours later), a gamma probe is placed over the thyroid gland to measure the amount of radioiodine uptake in the thyroid gland. The values are then compared.

    Thyroid uptake test

    illustration

  • Thyroid ultrasound

    Thyroid ultrasound

    Thyroid ultrasound is a sound wave picture of the thyroid gland taken by a hand-held instrument and translated to a 2-dimensional picture on a monitor. It is used in diagnosis of tumors, cysts or goiters of the thyroid, and is a painless, no-risk procedure.

    Thyroid ultrasound

    illustration

  • Thyroid function test

    Thyroid function test

    One way to evaluate the performance of the thyroid is through blood testing. The thyroid function test is a group of common tests used to evaluate how the thyroid is functioning. .

    Thyroid function test

    illustration

  • Thyroid gland

    Thyroid gland

    The thyroid gland, a part of the endocrine (hormone) system, plays a major role in regulating the body's metabolism.

    Thyroid gland

    illustration

  • Thyroid cancer - CT scan

    Thyroid cancer - CT scan

    This CT scan of the upper chest (thorax) shows a malignant thyroid tumor (cancer). The dark area around the trachea (marked by the white U-shaped tip of the respiratory tube) is an area where normal tissue has been eroded and died (necrosis) as a result of tumor growth.

    Thyroid cancer - CT scan

    illustration

  • Thyroid cancer - CT scan

    Thyroid cancer - CT scan

    This CT scan shows a thyroid cancer tumor in the throat, encircling, narrowing, and displacing the windpipe (trachea).

    Thyroid cancer - CT scan

    illustration

  • Thyroid enlargement - scintiscan

    Thyroid enlargement - scintiscan

    This image shows enlargement of the thyroid gland and extension down behind the breastbone (retrosternal space). The image, called a scintiscan, was generated using a radioactive isotope.

    Thyroid enlargement - scintiscan

    illustration

  • Incision for thyroid gland surgery

    Incision for thyroid gland surgery

    The thyroid is a gland located in the neck. It is a part of the endocrine (hormone) system, and plays a major role in regulating the body's metabolism. If surgery or an open excisional biopsy is needed, an incision is made in front of the neck to gain access to the thyroid gland.

    Incision for thyroid gland surgery

    illustration

  • Brain-thyroid link

    Brain-thyroid link

    Although the thyroid gland releases the hormones which govern growth and metabolism, the brain (the pituitary and the hypothalamus) manages the release and the balance of the amount of hormones circulated.

    Brain-thyroid link

    illustration

  • Thyroidectomy  - series

    Thyroidectomy - series

    Presentation

  • Parathyroidectomy  - series

    Parathyroidectomy - series

    Presentation

  • Hypothyroidism - Animation

    Hypothyroidism

    Animation

  • Hypothyroidism - Animation

    Do you feel tired and weak? Well, there could be many reasons for that, but a slow, underactive thyroid may be your problem. Let's talk about hypothyroidism - also known as Slow Thyroid. Here's the thyroid. It's this butterfly shaped gland in your neck - just below the voice box. The thyroid gland is known as the "master gland" of the body. It regulates our metabolism, so we don't act slow, like turtles, or fast, like jackrabbits. This gland releases hormones that control many important things, like helping your heart pump blood, stimulating your brain and muscles, and helping you keep your body at a healthy temperature. When you have hypothyroidism, your thyroid gland does not make enough hormone, so you end up feeling a bit slow, and perhaps cold, like the turtle. So, what causes a slow thyroid?For at least 9 out of 10 folks, the cause is something called Hashimoto's thyroiditis -- It's what we call an "autoimmune condition", where, for reasons that we don't quite understand, our own body attacks perfectly good thyroid tissue as though it were a foreign invader. This attack damages the thyroid gland, so much, that it can't put out enough hormone. This attack happens much more often in women than in men, 10 and 20 times more often. Also, some women develop this condition soon after pregnancy, Why that happens? Nobody knows for sure!So, how do you feel if you have a slow thyroid?If it's just mildly slow, you might not feel anything at all, that's called subclinical hypothyroidism. On the other hand, you might be experiencing symptoms of a slow thyroid RIGHT NOW, but you just haven't connected the dots. You might have mild fatigue, memory or concentration problems. You may have a decreased sex drive, or have trouble losing weight. If you have hypothyroidism, the main treatment is to use a synthetic form of T4 hormone, called Levothyroxine, that simply replaces what your body isn't producing. After starting hormone replacement, your hormone levels should be checked about every 6 weeks, to make sure you are maintaining normal levels. It's important to remember that treating hypothyroidism does not cure the problem, it only controls it. And once you're on Thyroid hormone replacement, you're probably on it for life. The good news is that once your thyroid situation is properly regulated, you'll probably feel a whole lot better.

  • Hyperthyroidism - Animation

    Hyperthyroidism

    Animation

  • Hyperthyroidism - Animation

    You're restless and nervous. You feel hungry all the time, but no matter how much you eat, you keep losing weight. You can't sleep or concentrate, and you feel hot and sweaty. If symptoms like these are putting you on edge, the problem may be an overactive thyroid gland, or hyperthyroidism. This little butterfly-shaped structure in your neck is your thyroid gland. It's job is to release the hormones that help control your body's energy levels, a process known as metabolism. When you have hyperthyroidism, that little gland goes into overdrive, releasing too much of its hormones. Having too much thyroid hormone is like putting your body in fast forward, everything speeds up. That's why you feel shaky, hungry, and your heart feels like it's pounding. So, what causes hyperthyroidism?You can develop an overactive thyroid because you've gotten too much iodine, an element the thyroid uses to make its hormones. Or, you might have a growth on your thyroid that's causing the excess hormone production. But many people with hyperthyroidism have an autoimmune disorder called Graves disease, which also makes their eyes bulge out. During an exam, your doctor may notice that your thyroid is larger than normal, and that you have high blood pressure, tremors, or a fast heart rate. These can all be signs of hypothyroidism. You'll probably have a blood test to check the levels of your thyroid hormones. If you do have an overactive thyroid, you may need to take medicine to slow down the gland and its hormone production. Or, your doctor may suggest having surgery to remove some or all of the thyroid, or taking radioactive iodine to destroy it. If you have surgery or radioactive iodine treatment, you'll probably need to take thyroid hormones for the rest of your life to replace the ones your body can no longer make. You can't prevent hyperthyroidism, but once you have it, it's usually pretty easy to treat. With the right treatment you can finally be free from its symptoms. While you're being treated, watch out for an emergency condition called thyroid crisis, or thyroid storm, which can set in if you've been under a lot of stress or have an infection. If you have a fever, fast and unsteady heartbeat, or you feel less alert than usual, call your emergency services number or go to the ER right away.

  • Thyroid gland biopsy

    Thyroid gland biopsy

    The thyroid is a gland located in the neck. It is a part of the endocrine (hormone) system, and plays a major role in regulating the body's metabolism. If a sample of cells is needed from the thyroid gland a fine needle biopsy can be performed. During this procedure, a skinny needle is inserted into the thyroid gland, and a sample of thyroid cells and fluid is drawn into the needle. The needle is then withdrawn and the cells are sent for examination. This test is usually performed to diagnose thyroid disease or thyroid cancer.

    Thyroid gland biopsy

    illustration

  • Thyroid uptake test

    Thyroid uptake test

    Radioactive iodine uptake test is a type of nuclear test performed to evaluate thyroid function. The patient ingests radioactive iodine (I-123 or I-131) capsules or liquid. After a time (usually 6 and 24-hours later), a gamma probe is placed over the thyroid gland to measure the amount of radioiodine uptake in the thyroid gland. The values are then compared.

    Thyroid uptake test

    illustration

  • Thyroid ultrasound

    Thyroid ultrasound

    Thyroid ultrasound is a sound wave picture of the thyroid gland taken by a hand-held instrument and translated to a 2-dimensional picture on a monitor. It is used in diagnosis of tumors, cysts or goiters of the thyroid, and is a painless, no-risk procedure.

    Thyroid ultrasound

    illustration

  • Thyroid function test

    Thyroid function test

    One way to evaluate the performance of the thyroid is through blood testing. The thyroid function test is a group of common tests used to evaluate how the thyroid is functioning. .

    Thyroid function test

    illustration

  • Thyroid gland

    Thyroid gland

    The thyroid gland, a part of the endocrine (hormone) system, plays a major role in regulating the body's metabolism.

    Thyroid gland

    illustration

  • Thyroid cancer - CT scan

    Thyroid cancer - CT scan

    This CT scan of the upper chest (thorax) shows a malignant thyroid tumor (cancer). The dark area around the trachea (marked by the white U-shaped tip of the respiratory tube) is an area where normal tissue has been eroded and died (necrosis) as a result of tumor growth.

    Thyroid cancer - CT scan

    illustration

  • Thyroid cancer - CT scan

    Thyroid cancer - CT scan

    This CT scan shows a thyroid cancer tumor in the throat, encircling, narrowing, and displacing the windpipe (trachea).

    Thyroid cancer - CT scan

    illustration

  • Thyroid enlargement - scintiscan

    Thyroid enlargement - scintiscan

    This image shows enlargement of the thyroid gland and extension down behind the breastbone (retrosternal space). The image, called a scintiscan, was generated using a radioactive isotope.

    Thyroid enlargement - scintiscan

    illustration

  • Incision for thyroid gland surgery

    Incision for thyroid gland surgery

    The thyroid is a gland located in the neck. It is a part of the endocrine (hormone) system, and plays a major role in regulating the body's metabolism. If surgery or an open excisional biopsy is needed, an incision is made in front of the neck to gain access to the thyroid gland.

    Incision for thyroid gland surgery

    illustration

  • Brain-thyroid link

    Brain-thyroid link

    Although the thyroid gland releases the hormones which govern growth and metabolism, the brain (the pituitary and the hypothalamus) manages the release and the balance of the amount of hormones circulated.

    Brain-thyroid link

    illustration

  • Thyroidectomy  - series

    Thyroidectomy - series

    Presentation

  • Parathyroidectomy  - series

    Parathyroidectomy - series

    Presentation

Review Date: 1/19/2018

Reviewed By: Richard LoCicero, MD, private practice specializing in hematology and medical oncology, Longstreet Cancer Center, Gainesville, GA. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- A.D.A.M., a business unit of Ebix, Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.
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