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  • After your child's umbilical hernia repair - Animation

    After your child's umbilical hernia repair

    Animation

  • After your child's umbilical hernia repair - Animation

    So what do you do after your child's had an umbilical hernia repaired? I'm Dr. Alan Greene with some tips for home care after that operation. Well, the first thing to know is that your child will probably go home with a bandage over the surgical site that's best to leave in place until your return visit to the doctor or until your doctor tells you to take it off. And while that bandage is there you want to keep that area pretty dry. That means usually sponge baths, not real bathing, not swimming certainly until it's time for that bandage to come off. Your doctor probably will give some pain medication for your child, especially that first couple days it can be pretty tender afterwards, so it's nice to give that pain medication around the clock when they're awake to kind of stay ahead of the pain instead of waiting until you know that they're uncomfortable. They can pretty well eat what they want once they go home and more or less normal activity. You'll want it kind of quiet for the first 3 or 4 days, but after that they can resume completely normal activity except for rough sports - you probably want to hold off for about a week or so to let that incision really strengthen. When should you call the doctor? It's a good idea to call the doctor if your child develops a new fever sometime afterwards over 101° or so. If their pain is increasing at any point or if they're having trouble urinating would be another reason. If vomiting or nausea develops in the couple of days after surgery. If there's an increase in redness or if it looks to you after the bandage comes off that the wound seems to be coming apart would all be reasons to get back in touch with the doctor. Most children with this operation though have no complications and if there are complications they're pretty easily dealt with. So, enjoy this quiet time with your child and then enjoy getting right back to regular activity sometime in the next week.

  • Spinal stenosis - Animation

    Spinal stenosis

    Animation

  • Spinal stenosis - Animation

    When you get up from a chair or take a walk, do you feel pain in your back, legs, shoulders, or arms? Do your arms or legs feel weaker than usual? If so, believe it or not, the problem could be in your spine, and the cause, a condition known as condition called spinal stenosis. Your spine is the column of bones that runs up the center of your back. It not only helps you stay upright but also flexes to allow you to bend and twist. These bones are called vertebrae, which are separated by spongy disks that cushion the bones so they don't rub against each other. As you get older, these spongy disks start to shrink, while the ligaments of your spine may swell up, due to arthritis. Together, these two actions narrow and put pressure on your spinal cord, or its exiting nerves, which is called spinal stenosis. You can also get spinal stenosis if you've had an injury like a slipped disk. So, how is spinal stenosis diagnosed?During an exam, your doctor will try to find the source of your pain or weakness by having you go through different motions. You'll sit, stand, walk, bend forward and backward, and lift your legs. The doctor will probably also test your reflexes with a rubber hammer, and use a feather or pin to see whether you've lost any feeling in feet and legs. Although there are surgical procedures to relieve the pressure on your spinal cord, trying a few measures at home first can help you avoid surgery. Physical therapy will teach you exercises and stretches to strengthen your muscles and improve your range of motion. Massage and acupuncture can be helpful for relieving back and neck pain. Putting heat or ice on a painful area can also help. Or, your doctor may recommend taking anti-inflammatory or pain-relieving medications. You can probably stay active with spinal stenosis, if you follow your doctor's recommendations and don't try to overdo it. Maybe you need to walk instead of jog, or play fewer holes on the golf course. If treatments at home don't work, surgery can often help relieve your symptoms, although it doesn't cure the condition and your pain may come back afterward. One of the biggest worries with spinal stenosis is numbness. If you can't feel pain in your legs or feet, you may get injured and not even realize it. An untreated injury can lead to an infection. Make sure to call your doctor if you have any numbness, pain, or other symptoms of spinal stenosis, especially trouble balancing or difficulty urinating or having a bowel movement. Take care of your spine. It's the only one you've got.

  • Types of health care providers

    Types of health care providers

    Health care providers range from generalists to providers who specialize in certain areas of the body or disease. Any category of medicine or care such as cancer or anesthesia can have a specialist. Nurses also can specialize in certain areas of medical care.

    Types of health care providers

    illustration

  • Denture care

    Denture care

    Dentures are used when an individual is missing his natural teeth. It is just as important to take care of dentures as it is to take care of natural teeth, since problems such as gingivitis can still occur.

    Denture care

    illustration

  • Infant dental care

    Infant dental care

    Even though newborns and infants do not have teeth, care of the mouth and gums is important. Use a damp washcloth to wipe your infant's gums after each meal and do not put your infant or young child to bed with a bottle of milk, juice, or sugar water. As the child grows, establishing proper dental hygiene will promote healthy teeth and gums which are essential to overall good health. Poor dental development, dental disease, and dental trauma can result in poor nutrition, painful and dangerous infections, problems with speech development, and problems with self image.

    Infant dental care

    illustration

  • Diabetic foot care

    Diabetic foot care

    People with diabetes must take special care of their fingers and toes to be sure they are receiving adequate blood supply.

    Diabetic foot care

    illustration

  • Carpal tunnel surgical procedure

    Carpal tunnel surgical procedure

    In treating carpal tunnel syndrome, surgery may be required to release the compressed median nerve. The open release procedure involves simply cutting the transverse carpal ligament.

    Carpal tunnel surgical procedure

    illustration

  • Diabetic foot care

    Diabetic foot care

    People with diabetes are prone to foot problems because the disease can cause damage to the blood vessels and nerves, which may result in decreased ability to sense a trauma to the foot. The immune system is also altered, so that the person with diabetes cannot efficiently fight infection.

    Diabetic foot care

    illustration

  • Infant care following delivery

    Infant care following delivery

    An evaluation of the newborn's condition is done immediately after delivery and again at five minutes, to determine the APGAR scores. If some cyanosis (bluish skin) is present, the APGAR scores are lower and oxygen may be administered. The oxygen can often be merely blown by the newborn's face, through the mask in front of the infant.

    Infant care following delivery

    illustration

  • Patent ductus arteriosis (PDA) - series

    Patent ductus arteriosis (PDA) - series

    Presentation

  • Tracheoesophageal fistula repair - series

    Tracheoesophageal fistula repair - series

    Presentation

  • Gastroschisis repair  - series

    Gastroschisis repair - series

    Presentation

  • Craniofacial reconstruction  - series

    Craniofacial reconstruction - series

    Presentation

  • After your child's umbilical hernia repair - Animation

    After your child's umbilical hernia repair

    Animation

  • After your child's umbilical hernia repair - Animation

    So what do you do after your child's had an umbilical hernia repaired? I'm Dr. Alan Greene with some tips for home care after that operation. Well, the first thing to know is that your child will probably go home with a bandage over the surgical site that's best to leave in place until your return visit to the doctor or until your doctor tells you to take it off. And while that bandage is there you want to keep that area pretty dry. That means usually sponge baths, not real bathing, not swimming certainly until it's time for that bandage to come off. Your doctor probably will give some pain medication for your child, especially that first couple days it can be pretty tender afterwards, so it's nice to give that pain medication around the clock when they're awake to kind of stay ahead of the pain instead of waiting until you know that they're uncomfortable. They can pretty well eat what they want once they go home and more or less normal activity. You'll want it kind of quiet for the first 3 or 4 days, but after that they can resume completely normal activity except for rough sports - you probably want to hold off for about a week or so to let that incision really strengthen. When should you call the doctor? It's a good idea to call the doctor if your child develops a new fever sometime afterwards over 101° or so. If their pain is increasing at any point or if they're having trouble urinating would be another reason. If vomiting or nausea develops in the couple of days after surgery. If there's an increase in redness or if it looks to you after the bandage comes off that the wound seems to be coming apart would all be reasons to get back in touch with the doctor. Most children with this operation though have no complications and if there are complications they're pretty easily dealt with. So, enjoy this quiet time with your child and then enjoy getting right back to regular activity sometime in the next week.

  • Spinal stenosis - Animation

    Spinal stenosis

    Animation

  • Spinal stenosis - Animation

    When you get up from a chair or take a walk, do you feel pain in your back, legs, shoulders, or arms? Do your arms or legs feel weaker than usual? If so, believe it or not, the problem could be in your spine, and the cause, a condition known as condition called spinal stenosis. Your spine is the column of bones that runs up the center of your back. It not only helps you stay upright but also flexes to allow you to bend and twist. These bones are called vertebrae, which are separated by spongy disks that cushion the bones so they don't rub against each other. As you get older, these spongy disks start to shrink, while the ligaments of your spine may swell up, due to arthritis. Together, these two actions narrow and put pressure on your spinal cord, or its exiting nerves, which is called spinal stenosis. You can also get spinal stenosis if you've had an injury like a slipped disk. So, how is spinal stenosis diagnosed?During an exam, your doctor will try to find the source of your pain or weakness by having you go through different motions. You'll sit, stand, walk, bend forward and backward, and lift your legs. The doctor will probably also test your reflexes with a rubber hammer, and use a feather or pin to see whether you've lost any feeling in feet and legs. Although there are surgical procedures to relieve the pressure on your spinal cord, trying a few measures at home first can help you avoid surgery. Physical therapy will teach you exercises and stretches to strengthen your muscles and improve your range of motion. Massage and acupuncture can be helpful for relieving back and neck pain. Putting heat or ice on a painful area can also help. Or, your doctor may recommend taking anti-inflammatory or pain-relieving medications. You can probably stay active with spinal stenosis, if you follow your doctor's recommendations and don't try to overdo it. Maybe you need to walk instead of jog, or play fewer holes on the golf course. If treatments at home don't work, surgery can often help relieve your symptoms, although it doesn't cure the condition and your pain may come back afterward. One of the biggest worries with spinal stenosis is numbness. If you can't feel pain in your legs or feet, you may get injured and not even realize it. An untreated injury can lead to an infection. Make sure to call your doctor if you have any numbness, pain, or other symptoms of spinal stenosis, especially trouble balancing or difficulty urinating or having a bowel movement. Take care of your spine. It's the only one you've got.

  • Types of health care providers

    Types of health care providers

    Health care providers range from generalists to providers who specialize in certain areas of the body or disease. Any category of medicine or care such as cancer or anesthesia can have a specialist. Nurses also can specialize in certain areas of medical care.

    Types of health care providers

    illustration

  • Denture care

    Denture care

    Dentures are used when an individual is missing his natural teeth. It is just as important to take care of dentures as it is to take care of natural teeth, since problems such as gingivitis can still occur.

    Denture care

    illustration

  • Infant dental care

    Infant dental care

    Even though newborns and infants do not have teeth, care of the mouth and gums is important. Use a damp washcloth to wipe your infant's gums after each meal and do not put your infant or young child to bed with a bottle of milk, juice, or sugar water. As the child grows, establishing proper dental hygiene will promote healthy teeth and gums which are essential to overall good health. Poor dental development, dental disease, and dental trauma can result in poor nutrition, painful and dangerous infections, problems with speech development, and problems with self image.

    Infant dental care

    illustration

  • Diabetic foot care

    Diabetic foot care

    People with diabetes must take special care of their fingers and toes to be sure they are receiving adequate blood supply.

    Diabetic foot care

    illustration

  • Carpal tunnel surgical procedure

    Carpal tunnel surgical procedure

    In treating carpal tunnel syndrome, surgery may be required to release the compressed median nerve. The open release procedure involves simply cutting the transverse carpal ligament.

    Carpal tunnel surgical procedure

    illustration

  • Diabetic foot care

    Diabetic foot care

    People with diabetes are prone to foot problems because the disease can cause damage to the blood vessels and nerves, which may result in decreased ability to sense a trauma to the foot. The immune system is also altered, so that the person with diabetes cannot efficiently fight infection.

    Diabetic foot care

    illustration

  • Infant care following delivery

    Infant care following delivery

    An evaluation of the newborn's condition is done immediately after delivery and again at five minutes, to determine the APGAR scores. If some cyanosis (bluish skin) is present, the APGAR scores are lower and oxygen may be administered. The oxygen can often be merely blown by the newborn's face, through the mask in front of the infant.

    Infant care following delivery

    illustration

  • Patent ductus arteriosis (PDA) - series

    Patent ductus arteriosis (PDA) - series

    Presentation

  • Tracheoesophageal fistula repair - series

    Tracheoesophageal fistula repair - series

    Presentation

  • Gastroschisis repair  - series

    Gastroschisis repair - series

    Presentation

  • Craniofacial reconstruction  - series

    Craniofacial reconstruction - series

    Presentation

Review Date: 9/3/2018

Reviewed By: Debra G. Wechter, MD, FACS, general surgery practice specializing in breast cancer, Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- A.D.A.M., a business unit of Ebix, Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.
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