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Spitting up - self-care

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Spitting up
Baby burping position
Baby spitting up

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Description

Spitting up is common with babies. Babies may spit up when they burp or with their drool. Spitting up should not cause your baby any distress. Most often babies stop spitting up when they are about 7 to 12 months old.

Why Babies Spit up

Your baby is spitting up because:

Spitting up is often not due to a formula intolerance or an allergy to something in the nursing mother's diet.

Spitting up is Often Normal

If your baby is healthy, happy, and growing well, you don't need to worry. Babies that are growing well often gain at least 6 ounces (170 grams) a week and have wet diapers at least every 6 hours.

How to Reduce Spitting up

To reduce spitting up you can:

When to Call the Doctor

If your baby's spit up is forceful, call your baby's provider. You want to make sure your baby does not have pyloric stenosis, a problem where the valve at the bottom of the stomach is too tight and needs to be fixed.

Also, call your provider if your baby often cries during or after feedings or often cannot be soothed after feedings.

References

Hibbs AM. Gastrointestinal reflux and motility in the neonate. In: Martin RJ, Fanaroff AA, Walsh MC, eds. Fanaroff and Martin's Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine. 11th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2020:chap 82.

Maqbool A, Liacouras CA. Normal digestive tract phenomena. In: Kliegman RM, St. Geme JW, Blum NJ, Shah SS, Tasker RC, Wilson KM, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics. 21st ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2020:chap 331.

Noel RJ. Vomiting and regurgitation. In: Kliegman RM, Lye SP, Bordini BJ, Toth H, Basel D, eds. Nelson Pediatric Symptom-Based Diagnosis. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2018:chap 12.

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Review Date: 7/22/2020  

Reviewed By: Charles I. Schwartz MD, FAAP, Clinical Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, General Pediatrician at PennCare for Kids, Phoenixville, PA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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