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Labyrinthitis - aftercare

Bacterial labyrinthitis - aftercare; Serous labyrinthitis - aftercare; Neuronitis - vestibular - aftercare; Vestibular neuronitis - aftercare; Viral neurolabyrinthitis - aftercare; Vestibular neuritis vertigo - aftercare; Labyrinthitis - dizziness - aftercare; Labyrinthitis - vertigo - aftercare

Description

You may have seen your health care provider because you have had labyrinthitis. This inner ear problem can cause you to feel like you are spinning (vertigo).

Most of the worst symptoms of vertigo will go away within a week. However, you may feel dizzy at times for another 2 to 3 months.

Self-care

Being dizzy can cause you to lose your balance, fall, and hurt yourself. These tips can help keep symptoms from getting worse and keep you safe:

If symptoms continue, ask your provider about balance therapy. Balance therapy includes head, eye, and body exercises you can do at home to help train your brain to overcome dizziness.

Symptoms of labyrinthitis can cause stress. Make healthy lifestyle choices to help you cope, such as:

Help ease stress by using relaxation techniques, such as:

Medicines

For some people, diet alone will not be enough. If needed, your provider may also give you:

Most of these medicines may make you sleepy. So you should first take them when you do not have to drive or be alert for important tasks.

You should have regular follow-up visits and lab work as suggested by your provider.

When to Call the Doctor

Call your provider if:

Call 911 or your local emergency number if you have any of the following severe symptoms:

References

Chang AK. Dizziness and vertigo. In: Walls RM, Hockberger RS, Gausche-Hill M, eds. Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice. 9th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2018:chap 16.

Crane BT, Minor LB. Peripheral vestibular disorders. In: Flint PW, Haughey BH, Lund V, et al, eds. Cummings Otolaryngology: Head and Neck Surgery. 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 165.

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Review Date: 10/6/2019  

Reviewed By: Alireza Minagar, MD, MBA, Professor, Department of Neurology, LSU Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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