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Staph infections - self-care at home

Staphylococcus infections - self-care at home; Methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus infections - self-care at home; MRSA infections - self-care at home

Description

Staph (pronounced staff) is short for Staphylococcus. Staph is a type of germ (bacteria) that can cause infections almost anywhere in the body.

One type of staph germ, called methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), is harder to treat. This is because MRSA is not killed by certain medicines (antibiotics) used to treat other staph germs.

How Does Staph Spread?

Many healthy people normally have staph on their skin, in their noses, or other body areas. Most of the time, the germ does not cause an infection or symptoms. This is called being colonized with staph. These persons are known as carriers. They can spread staph to others. Some people colonized by staph develop an actual staph infection that makes them sick.

Most staph germs are spread by skin-to-skin contact. They can also be spread when you touch something that has the staph germ on it, such as clothing or a towel. Staph germs can then enter a break in the skin, such as cuts, scratches, or pimples. Usually the infection is minor and stays in the skin. But the infection can spread deeper and affect the blood, bones, or joints. Organs such as the lungs, heart, or brain can also be affected. Serious cases can be life-threatening.

What are the Risk Factors for Staph Infection?

You are more likely to get a staph infection if you:

How Do You Know If You Have a Staph Infection?

Symptoms depend on where the infection is located. For example, with a skin infection you may have a boil or a painful rash called impetigo. With a serious infection, such as toxic shock syndrome, you may have a high fever, nausea and vomiting, and a sunburn-like rash.

The only way to know for sure if you have a staph infection is by seeing a health care provider.

Treatment

If test results show you have a staph infection, treatment may include:

Preventing Staph Infection

Follow these steps to avoid a staph infection and prevent it from spreading.

Simple steps for athletes include:

References

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. Staph infections can kill. www.cdc.gov/vitalsigns/staph/index.html. Updated March 22, 2019. Accessed May 23, 2019.

Chambers HF. Staphylococcal infections. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil Medicine. 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 288.

Rupp ME, Fey PD. Staphylococcus epidermidis and other coagulase-negative. Staphylococci. In: Bennett JE, Dolin R, Blaser MJ, eds. Mandell, Douglas, and Bennett's Principles and Practice of Infectious Diseases, Updated Edition. 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 197.

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Review Date: 5/8/2019  

Reviewed By: David C. Dugdale, III, MD, Professor of Medicine, Division of General Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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