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Pulmonary hypertension - at home

Pulmonary hypertension - self care; Activity - pulmonary hypertension; Preventing infections - pulmonary hypertension; Oxygen - pulmonary hypertension

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Primary pulmonary hypertension

Description

Pulmonary hypertension (PAH) is abnormally high blood pressure in the arteries of the lungs. With PAH, the right side of the heart has to work harder than normal.

As the illness gets worse, you will need to do more to take care of yourself. You will also need to make changes in your home and get more help around the house.

Keep Active

Try walking to build up strength:

Ride a stationary bike. Ask your doctor or therapist how long and how hard to ride.

Get stronger even when you are sitting:

Self-care

Other tips for self-care include:

Stay Away From Infections

You should:

Around the Home

Make it easier for yourself at home.

To save your energy:

Going Home with Oxygen

In the hospital, you received oxygen treatment. You may need to use oxygen at home. Do not change how much oxygen is flowing without asking your doctor.

Have a backup supply of oxygen at home or with you when you go out. Keep the phone number of your oxygen supplier with you at all times. Learn how to use oxygen safely at home.

If you check your oxygen with an oximeter at home and your number often drops below 90%, call your doctor.

Make sure you have enough supply of your medicines. Abruptly stopping them can lead to serious illness.

Follow-up

Your hospital health care provider may ask you to make a follow-up visit with:

When to Call the Doctor

Call your doctor if your breathing is:

Also call your doctor if:

References

Lammi MR, Mathai SC. Pulmonary hypertension: general approach. In: Broaddus VC, King TE, Ernst JD, et al, eds. Murray and Nadel's Textbook of Respiratory Medicine. 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2022:chap 83.

McLaughlin VV, Humbert M. Pulmonary hypertension. In: Zipes DP, Libby P, Bonow RO, Mann DL, Tomaselli GF, Braunwald E, eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine. 11th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2019:chap 85.

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Review Date: 5/30/2021  

Reviewed By: Denis Hadjiliadis, MD, MHS, Paul F. Harron Jr. Associate Professor of Medicine, Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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