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Hysteroscopy

Hysteroscopic surgery; Operative hysteroscopy; Uterine endoscopy; Uteroscopy; Vaginal bleeding - hysteroscopy; Uterine bleeding - hysteroscopy; Adhesions - hysteroscopy; Birth defects - hysteroscopy

Hysteroscopy is a procedure to look at the inside of the womb (uterus). Your health care provider can look at the:

This procedure is commonly used to diagnose bleeding problems in women, remove polyps or fibroids, or perform sterilization procedures. It may be done in a hospital, outpatient surgery center, or the provider's office.

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Description

Hysteroscopy gets its name from the thin, lighted tool used to view the womb, called a hysteroscope. This tool sends images of the inside of the womb to a video monitor.

Before the procedure, you will be given medicine to help you relax and block pain. Sometimes, medicine is given to help you fall asleep. During the procedure:

Small tools can be placed through the scope to remove abnormal growths (fibroids or polyps) or tissue for examination.

Hysteroscopy can last from 15 minutes to more than 1 hour, depending on what is done.

Why the Procedure Is Performed

This procedure may be done to:

This procedure may also have other uses not listed here.

Risks

Risks of hysteroscopy may include:

Risks of any pelvic surgery may include:

Risks of anesthesia include:

Risks of any surgery include:

Biopsy results are usually available within 1 to 2 weeks.

Before the Procedure

Your provider may prescribe medicine to open your cervix. This makes it easier to insert the scope. You need to take this medicine about 8 to 12 hours before your procedure.

Before any surgery, tell your provider:

In the 2 weeks before your procedure:

On the day of the procedure:

After the Procedure

You may go home the same day. Rarely, you may need to stay overnight. You may have:

You can return to normal daily activities within 1 to 2 days. DO NOT have sex until your provider says it is OK.

Outlook (Prognosis)

Your provider will tell you the results of your procedure.

References

Carlson SM, Goldberg J, Lentz GM. Endoscopy: hysteroscopy and laparoscopy: indications, contraindications, and complications. In: Lobo RA, Gershenson DM, Lentz GM, Valea FA, eds. Comprehensive Gynecology. 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2017:chap 10.

Howitt BE, Quick CM, Nucci MR, Crum CP. Adenocarcinoma, carcinosarcoma, and other epithelial tumors of the endometrium. In: Crum CP, Nucci MR, Howitt BE, Granter SR, Parast MM, Boyd TK, eds. Diagnostic Gynecologic and Obstetric Pathology. 3rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2018:chap 19.

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Review Date: 12/3/2020  

Reviewed By: LaQuita Martinez, MD, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Emory Johns Creek Hospital, Alpharetta, GA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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