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Cloudy cornea

Corneal opacification; Corneal scarring; Corneal edema

A cloudy cornea is a loss of transparency of the cornea.

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Eye
Cloudy cornea

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Causes

The cornea makes up the front wall of the eye. It is normally clear. It helps focus the light entering the eye.

Causes of cloudy cornea include:

Clouding may affect all or part of the cornea. It leads to different amounts of vision loss. You may not have any symptoms in the early stages.

Home Care

Consult your health care provider. There is no appropriate home care.

When to Contact a Medical Professional

Contact your provider if:

Note: You will need to see an ophthalmologist for vision or eye problems. However, your primary provider may also be involved if the problem could be due to a whole-body (systemic) disease.

What to Expect at Your Office Visit

The provider will examine your eyes and ask about your medical history. The two main questions will be if your vision is affected and if you have seen a spot on the front of your eye.

Other questions may include:

Tests may include:

Related Information

Iris
Blindness and vision loss

References

Cioffi GA, Liebmann JM. Diseases of the visual system. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil Medicine. 26th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2020:chap 395.

Guluma K, Lee JE. Ophthalmology. In: Walls RM, Hockberger RS, Gausche-Hill M, eds. Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice. 9th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2018:chap 61.

Kataguiri P, Kenyon KR, Batta P, Wadia HP, Sugar J. Corneal and external eye manifestations of systemic disease. In: Yanoff M, Duker JS, eds. Ophthalmology. 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2019:chap 4.25.

Lisch W, Weiss JS. Early and late clinical landmarks of corneal dystrophies. Exp Eye Res. 2020;198:108139. PMID: 32726603 pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32726603/.

Patel SS, Goldstein DA. Episcleritis and scleritis. In: Yanoff M, Duker JS, eds. Ophthalmology. 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2019:chap 4.11.

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Review Date: 8/18/2020  

Reviewed By: Franklin W. Lusby, MD, ophthalmologist, Lusby Vision Institute, La Jolla, CA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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