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Testicle pain

Pain - testicle; Orchalgia; Epididymitis; Orchitis

Testicle pain is discomfort in one or both testicles. The pain can spread into the lower abdomen.

Images

Male reproductive anatomy

Causes

The testicles are very sensitive. Even a minor injury can cause pain. In some conditions, abdominal pain may occur before testicle pain.

Common causes of testicle pain include:

Mild pain may be caused by fluid collection in the scrotum, such as:

Home Care

Non-urgent causes of testicle pain, such as minor injuries and fluid collection, can often be treated with home care. The following steps may reduce discomfort and swelling:

Take the antibiotics your health care provider gives you if the pain is caused by infection. Preventive measures to take:

When to Contact a Medical Professional

Sudden, severe testicle pain needs immediate medical care.

Call your provider right away or go to an emergency room if:

Also call your provider right away if:

What to Expect at Your Office Visit

Your provider will do an exam of your groin, testicles, and abdomen. Your provider will ask you questions about the pain such as:

The following tests may be performed:

Related Information

Testes
Scrotum
Abdominal pain
Testicular torsion
Testicular cancer
Testicle lump

References

Matsumoto AM, Anawalt BD. Testicular disorders. In: Melmed S, Auchus RJ, Goldfine AB, Koenig RJ, Rosen CJ, eds. Williams Textbook of Endocrinology. 14th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2020:chap 19.

McGowan CC. Prostatitis, epididymitis, and orchitis. In: Bennett JE, Dolin R, Blaser MJ, eds. Mandell, Douglas, and Bennett's Principles and Practice of Infectious Diseases. 9th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2020:chap 110.

Nickel JC. Inflammatory and pain conditions of the male genitourinary tract: prostatitis and related pain conditions, orchitis, and epididymitis. In: Wein AJ, Kavoussi LR, Partin AW, Peters CA, eds. Campbell-Walsh Urology. 11th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 13.

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Review Date: 7/31/2019  

Reviewed By: Sovrin M. Shah, MD, Assistant Professor, Department of Urology, The Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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