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Chalazion

Meibomian gland lipogranuloma

A chalazion is a small bump in the eyelid caused by a blockage of a tiny oil gland.

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Causes

A chalazion is caused by a blocked duct in one of the meibomian glands. These glands are located in the eyelid directly behind the eyelashes. They produce a thin, oily fluid that lubricates the eye.

Symptoms

A chalazion often develops following an internal hordeolum (also called a stye). The eyelid most often becomes tender, red, swollen and warm. Sometimes, the blocked gland causing the stye will not drain even though the redness and swelling go away. The gland will form a firm nodule in the eyelid that is not tender. This is called a chalazion.

Exams and Tests

An exam of the eyelid confirms the diagnosis.

Rarely, skin cancer of the eyelid may look like a chalazion. If this is suspected, you may need a biopsy.

Treatment

A chalazion will often go away without treatment in a month or so.

If the chalazion continues to get bigger, it may need to be removed with surgery. This is most often done from the inside of the eyelid to avoid a scar on the skin.

Steroid injection is another treatment option.

Outlook (Prognosis)

Chalazia most often heal on their own. The outcome with treatment is excellent in most cases.

Possible Complications

Rarely, a chalazion will heal by itself but may leave a scar on the eyelid. This problem is more common after surgery to remove the chalazion, but is still rare. You may lose some eyelashes or you may have a small notch in the edge of the eyelid. The most common complication is a return of the problem.

When to Contact a Medical Professional

Call your health care provider if lumps on the eyelid continue to get bigger despite treatment, or you have an area of eyelash loss.

Prevention

It may help to gently scrub the edge of the lid at the eyelash line nightly to prevent chalazia or styes. Use eye cleansing pads or diluted baby shampoo.

Apply antibiotic ointment prescribed by your provider after scrubbing the eyelids. You can also apply warm compresses to the eyelid daily.

Related Information

Astigmatism

References

Neff AG, Chahal HS, Carter KD. Benign eyelid lesions. In: Yanoff M, Duker JS, eds. Ophthalmology. 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2019:chap 12.7.

Yanoff M, Cameron JD. Diseases of the visual system. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil Medicine. 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 423.

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Review Date: 9/30/2018  

Reviewed By: Audrey Tai, DO, MS, Assistant Clinical Professor (Voluntary), University of California - Irvine, Irvine, CA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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