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Keloids

Keloid scar; Scar - keloid

A keloid is a growth of extra scar tissue. It occurs where the skin has healed after an injury.

Images

Keloid above the ear
Keloid - pigmented
Keloid - on the foot

Causes

Keloids can form after skin injuries from:

Keloids are most common in people younger than 30. Black people, Asians, and Hispanics are more prone to developing keloids. Keloids often run in families. Sometimes, a person may not recall what injury caused a keloid to form.

Symptoms

A keloid may be:

A keloid will tan darker than the skin around it if exposed to the sun during the first year after it forms. The darker color may not go away.

Exams and Tests

Your doctor will look at your skin to see if you have a keloid. A skin biopsy may be done to rule out other types of skin growths (tumors).

Treatment

Keloids often do not need treatment. If the keloid bothers you, discuss your concern with a skin doctor (dermatologist). The doctor may recommend these treatments to reduce the size of the keloid:

These treatments, especially surgery, sometimes cause the keloid scar to become larger.

Outlook (Prognosis)

Keloids usually are not harmful to your health, but they may affect how you look.

When to Contact a Medical Professional

Call your health care provider if:

Prevention

When you are in the sun:

Continue to follow these steps for at least 6 months after injury or surgery for adults. Children may need up to 18 months of prevention.

Imiquimod cream may help prevent keloids from forming after surgery. The cream may also prevent keloids from returning after they are removed.

Related Information

Chickenpox
Acne

References

Dinulos JGH. Benign skin tumors. In: Dinulos JGH, ed. Habif's Clinical Dermatology. 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2021:chap 20.

Patterson JW. Disorders of collagen. In: Patterson JW, ed. Weedon's Skin Pathology. 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2021:chap 12.

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Review Date: 11/10/2020  

Reviewed By: Ramin Fathi, MD, FAAD, Director, Phoenix Surgical Dermatology Group, Phoenix, AZ. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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