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Cirrhosis - discharge

Liver failure - discharge; Liver cirrhosis - discharge

Cirrhosis is scarring of the liver and poor liver function. It is the last stage of chronic liver disease. You were in the hospital to treat this condition.

When You're in the Hospital

You have cirrhosis of the liver. Scar tissue forms and your liver gets smaller and harder. Most of the time, this damage cannot be undone. However, the problems it causes can be treated.

While you were in the hospital, you may have had:

What to Expect at Home

Your health care provider will talk with you about what to expect at home. This will depend on your symptoms and what caused your cirrhosis.

Medicines you may need to take include:

Self-care

Do not drink any alcohol. Your provider can help you stop drinking.

Limit salt in your diet.

Ask your provider before taking any other medicines, vitamins, herbs, or supplements that you buy at the store. This includes acetaminophen (Tylenol), cold medicines, aspirin, ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), naproxen (Aleve), and others.

Ask if you need shots or vaccines for hepatitis A, hepatitis B, lung infections, and the flu.

You will need to see your provider for regular follow-up visits. Make sure you go to these visits so your condition can be checked.

Other tips for caring for your liver are:

When to Call the Doctor

Call your provider if you have:

Related Information

Cirrhosis
Bleeding esophageal varices
Alcoholic liver disease
Primary biliary cirrhosis
Alcohol use disorder
Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS)
How to read food labels
Low-salt diet

References

Garcia-Tsao G. Cirrhosis and its sequelae. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil Medicine. 26th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2020:chap 144.

Kamath PS, Shah VH. Overview of cirrhosis. In: Feldman M, Friedman LS, Brandt LJ, eds. Sleisenger and Fordtran's Gastrointestinal and Liver Disease. 11th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2021:chap 74.

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Review Date: 1/15/2021  

Reviewed By: Michael M. Phillips, MD, Emeritus Professor of Medicine, The George Washington University School of Medicine, Washington, DC. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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