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Allergic rhinitis - what to ask your doctor - child

What to ask your doctor about allergic rhinitis - child; Hay fever - what to ask your doctor - child; Allergies - what to ask your doctor - child

Allergies to pollen, dust mites, and animal dander are also called allergic rhinitis. Hay fever is another word often used for this problem. Symptoms are usually a watery, runny nose and itching in your eyes and nose.

Below are some questions you may want to ask your child's health care provider to help you take care of your child's allergies.

Questions

What is my child allergic to? Will my child's symptoms be worse inside or outside? At what time of year will my child's symptoms feel worse?

Does my child need allergy tests? Does my child need allergy shots?

What sort of changes should I make around the home?

Is my child taking their allergy medicines the right way?

Will my child have wheezing or asthma?

What shots or vaccinations does my child need?

How do I find out when smog or pollution is worse in our area?

What does my child's school or daycare need to know about allergies? How do I make sure my child can use the medicines at school?

Are there times when my child should avoid being outside?

Does my child need tests or treatments for allergies? What should I do when I know my child will be around something that makes their allergy symptoms worse?

Related Information

Common cold
Allergies
Allergic rhinitis
Asthma and allergy resources
Allergen
Sneezing
Allergy testing - skin
Stay away from asthma triggers
Allergic rhinitis - what to ask your doctor - adult

References

Baroody FM. Pediatric chronic rhinosinusitis. In: Flint PW, Francis HW, Haughey BH, et al, eds. Cummings Otolaryngology: Head and Neck Surgery. 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2021:chap 200.

Constantinescu A. Pulmonology. In: Polin RA, Ditmar MF, eds. Pediatric Secrets. 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2021:chap 16.

Milgrom H, Sicherer SH. Allergic rhinitis.In: Kliegman RM, St. Geme JW, Blum NJ, Shah SS, Tasker RC, Wilson KM, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics. 21st ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2020:chap 168.

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Review Date: 2/2/2021  

Reviewed By: Neil K. Kaneshiro, MD, MHA, Clinical Professor of Pediatrics, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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