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Your diet after gastric bypass surgery

Gastric bypass surgery - your diet; Obesity - diet after bypass; Weight loss - diet after bypass

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Roux-en-Y stomach surgery for weight loss

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Gastric bypass surgery changes the way your body handles food. This article will tell you how to adapt to a new way of eating after the surgery.

What to Expect at Home

You had gastric bypass surgery. This surgery made your stomach smaller by closing off most of your stomach with staples. It changed the way your body handles the food you eat. You will eat less food, and your body will not absorb all the calories from the food you eat.

Your health care provider will teach you about foods you can eat and foods you should avoid. It is very important to follow these diet guidelines.

When you go Home From the Hospital

You will eat only liquid or puréed food for 2 or 3 weeks after the surgery. You will slowly add in soft foods, then regular food.

You will lose weight quickly over the first 3 to 6 months. During this time, you may:

These symptoms are normal. They should go away as you take in more protein and calories as your body gets used to your weight loss.

A new way of Eating

Remember to eat slowly and chew each bite very slowly and completely. Do not swallow food until it is smooth. The opening between your new stomach pouch and your intestines is very small. Food that is not chewed well can block this opening.

Some foods you eat may cause some pain or discomfort if you do not chew them completely. Some of these are pasta, rice, bread, raw vegetables, and meats, especially steak. Adding a low-fat sauce, broth, or gravy can make them easier to digest. Other foods that may cause discomfort are dry foods, such as popcorn and nuts, or fibrous foods, such as celery and corn.

You will need to drink up to 8 cups (2 L) of water or other calorie-free liquids every day. Follow these guidelines for drinking:

Follow Your Diet Carefully

You will need to make sure you are getting enough protein, vitamins, and minerals while you are losing weight quickly. Eating mostly protein, fruits, vegetables, and whole grains will help your body get the nutrients it needs.

Protein may be the most important of these foods early after surgery. Your body needs protein to build muscles and other body tissues, and to heal well after surgery. Low-fat protein choices include:

After gastric bypass surgery, your body will not absorb some important vitamins and minerals. You will need to take these vitamins and minerals for the rest of your life:

You may need to take other supplements also.

You will need to have regular checkups with your provider to keep track of your weight and to make sure you are eating well. These visits are a good time to talk with your provider about any problems you are having with your diet, or about other issues related to your surgery and recovery.

Calories Still Count

Avoid foods that are high in calories. It is important to get all of the nutrition you need without eating too many calories.

Portions and serving sizes still count. Your dietitian or nutritionist can give you suggested serving sizes of the foods in your diet.

If you gain weight after gastric bypass surgery, ask yourself:

When to Call the Doctor

Call your provider if:

Related Information

Gastric bypass surgery
Obesity
Laparoscopic gastric banding
Gastric bypass surgery - discharge
Laparoscopic gastric banding - discharge
After weight-loss surgery - what to ask your doctor
Before weight-loss surgery - what to ask your doctor

References

Heber D, Greenway FL, Kaplan LM, et al. Endocrine and nutritional management of the post-bariatric surgery patient: an Endocrine Society Clinical Practice Guideline. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2010;95(11):4823-4843. PMID: 21051578 pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/21051578/.

Mechanick JI, Apovian C, Brethauer S, et al. Clinical practice guidelines for the perioperative nutritional, metabolic, and nonsurgical support of the bariatric surgery patient - 2019 update: cosponsored by American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists/American College of Endocrinology, the Obesity Society, American Society for Metabolic & Bariatric Surgery, Obesity Medicine Association, and American Society of Anesthesiologists. Surg Obes Relat Dis. 2020;16(2):175-247. PMID: 31917200 pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31917200/.

Sullivan S, Edmundowicz SA, Morton JM. Surgical and endoscopic treatment of obesity. In: Feldman M, Friedman LS, Brandt LJ, eds. Sleisenger and Fordtran's Gastrointestinal and Liver Disease. 11th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2021:chap 8.

Tavakkoli A, Cooney RN. Metabolic changes following bariatric surgery. In: Cameron AM, Cameron JL, eds. Current Surgical Therapy. 13th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2020:797-801.

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Review Date: 7/20/2020  

Reviewed By: Jonas DeMuro, MD, Assistant Professor of Surgery, Stony Brook School of Medicine, Stony Brook, NY. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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