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Tonsil and adenoid removal - discharge

Adenoidectomy - discharge; Removal of adenoid glands - discharge; Tonsillectomy - discharge

When You're in the Hospital

Your child had surgery to remove the adenoid glands in the throat. These glands are located between the airway between the nose and the back of the throat. Often, adenoids are removed at the same time as the tonsils (tonsillectomy).

What to Expect at Home

Complete recovery takes about 2 weeks. If only the adenoids are removed, the recovery most often takes only a few days. Your child will have pain or discomfort that will get better slowly. Your child's tongue, mouth, throat, or jaw may be sore from the surgery.

While healing, your child may have:

Self-care

If there is bleeding in the throat and mouth, have your child spit out the blood instead of swallowing it.

Try soft foods and cool drinks to ease throat pain, such as:

Foods and drinks to avoid are:

Your child's health care provider will probably prescribe pain drugs for your child to use as needed.

Avoid drugs that contain aspirin. Acetaminophen (Tylenol) is a good choice for pain after surgery. Ask your child's provider if it is OK for your child to take acetaminophen.

When to Call the Doctor

Call the provider if your child has:

Related Information

Adenoid removal
Tonsillectomy
Obstructive sleep apnea - adults
Tonsillitis
Enlarged adenoids
Otitis media with effusion
Tonsil removal - what to ask your doctor

References

Goldstein NA. Evaluation and management of pediatric obstructive sleep apnea. In: Flint PW, Haughey BH, Lund V, et al, eds. Cummings Otolaryngology: Head and Neck Surgery. 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 184.

Wetmore RF. Tonsils and adenoids. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St. Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics. 20th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 383.

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Review Date: 11/4/2018  

Reviewed By: Josef Shargorodsky, MD, MPH, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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