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How to breathe when you are short of breath

Pursed lip breathing; COPD - pursed lip breathing; Emphysema - pursed lip breathing; Chronic bronchitis - pursed lip breathing; Pulmonary fibrosis - pursed lip breathing; Interstitial lung disease - pursed lip breathing; Hypoxia - pursed lip breathing; Chronic respiratory failure - pursed lip breathing

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Pursed lip breathing

When to use Pursed lip Breathing

Pursed lip breathing helps you use less energy to breathe. It can help you relax. When you are short of breath, it helps you slow the pace of your breathing and can help you feel less short of breath.

Use pursed lip breathing when you do things that make you short of breath, such as when you:

You can practice pursed lip breathing anytime. Try to practice 4 or 5 times a day when you:

How to do Pursed lip Breathing

The steps to do pursed lip breathing are:

  1. Relax the muscles in your neck and shoulders.
  2. Sit in a comfortable chair with your feet on the floor.
  3. Inhale slowly through your nose for 2 counts.
  4. Feel your belly get larger as you breathe in.
  5. Pucker your lips, as if you were going to whistle or blow out a candle.
  6. Exhale slowly through your lips for 4 or more counts.

Exhale normally. Do not force the air out. Do not hold your breath when you are doing pursed lip breathing. Repeat these steps until your breathing slows.

Related Information

Lung surgery
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)
Cystic fibrosis
Interstitial lung disease
Community-acquired pneumonia in adults
Bronchiolitis
Breathing difficulty
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease - adults - discharge
Interstitial lung disease - adults - discharge
COPD - control drugs
COPD - quick-relief drugs
Lung surgery - discharge

References

Minichiello VJ. Therapeutic breathing. In: Rakel D, ed. Integrative Medicine. 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2018:chap 92.

Rochester CL, Nici L. Pulmonary rehabilitation. In: Broaddus VC, Ernst JD, King TE, Lazarus SC, Sarmiento KF, Schnapp LM, Stapleton RD, eds. Murray and Nadel's Textbook of Respiratory Medicine. 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2022:chap 139.

Schwartzstein RM, Adams L. Dyspnea. In: Broaddus VC, Ernst JD, King TE, Lazarus SC, Sarmiento KF, Schnapp LM, Stapleton RD, eds. Murray and Nadel's Textbook of Respiratory Medicine. 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2022:chap 36.

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Review Date: 1/17/2022  

Reviewed By: David C. Dugdale, III, MD, Professor of Medicine, Division of General Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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