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Exercising and asthma at school

Asthma - exercise school; Exercise - induced asthma - school

Description

Sometimes exercise triggers asthma symptoms. This is called exercise-induced asthma (EIA).

The symptoms of EIA are coughing, wheezing, a feeling of tightness in your chest, or shortness of breath. Most times, these symptoms start soon after you stop exercising. Some people may have symptoms after they start exercising.

Be Careful Where and When the Student Exercises

Having asthma symptoms when exercising does not mean a student cannot or should not exercise. Taking part in recess, physical education (PE), and after-school sports is important for all children. And children with asthma should not have to sit on the side lines.

School staff and coaches should know your child's asthma triggers, such as:

A student with asthma should warm up before exercising and cool down afterward.

Helping a Child With Asthma Stay Active in School

Read the student's asthma action plan. Make sure staff members know where it is kept. Discuss the action plan with the parent or guardian. Find out what type of activities the student can do and for how long.

Teachers, coaches, and other school staff should know the symptoms of asthma and what to do if a student has an asthma attack. Help the student take the medicines listed in their asthma action plan.

Encourage the student to participate in PE. To help prevent an asthma attack, modify PE activities. For example, a running program might be set up this way:

Some exercises may be less likely to trigger asthma symptoms.

Activities that are more intense and sustained, such as long periods of running, basketball, and soccer, are more likely to trigger asthma symptoms.

Taking Asthma Medicines Before Exercise

If an asthma action plan instructs the student to take medicines before exercising, remind the student to do so. These may include short-acting and long-acting medicines.

Short-acting, or quick-relief, medicines:

Long-acting inhaled medicines:

Children can take long-acting medicines before school and they will help for the whole day.

Related Information

Asthma
Asthma in children
Asthma and allergy resources
Asthma - child - discharge
Asthma - control drugs
Asthma - quick-relief drugs
Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction
Make peak flow a habit
Signs of an asthma attack
Stay away from asthma triggers
How to use a nebulizer
Asthma and school
How to use an inhaler - no spacer
How to use an inhaler - with spacer
How to use your peak flow meter
Asthma in children - what to ask your doctor

References

Bergstrom J, Kurth M, Hieman BE, et al. Institute for Clinical Systems Improvement website. Health Care Guideline: Diagnosis and Management of Asthma. 11th ed. www.icsi.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/Asthma.pdf. Updated December 2016. Accessed February 7, 2020.

Brannan JD, Kaminsky DA, Hallstrand TS. Approach to the patient with exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. In: Burks AW, Holgate ST, O'Hehir RE, et al, eds. Middleton's Allergy: Principles and Practice. 9th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2020:chap 54.

Vishwanathan RK, Busse WW. Management of asthma in adolescents and adults. In: Burks AW, Holgate ST, O'Hehir RE, et al, eds. Middleton's Allergy: Principles and Practice. 9th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2020:chap 52.

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Review Date: 1/13/2020  

Reviewed By: Laura J. Martin, MD, MPH, ABIM Board Certified in Internal Medicine and Hospice and Palliative Medicine, Atlanta, GA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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