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Asthma and school

Asthma action plan - school; Wheezing - school; Reactive airway disease - school; Bronchial asthma - school

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Description

Children with asthma need a lot of support at school. They may need help from school staff to keep their asthma under control and to be able to do school activities.

You should give your child's school staff an asthma action plan that tells them how to take care of your child's asthma. Ask your child's health care provider to write one.

The student and school staff should follow this asthma action plan. Your child should be able to take asthma medicines at school when needed.

School staff should know what things make your child's asthma worse. These are called triggers. Your child should be able to go to another location to get away from asthma triggers, if needed.

What Should be in Your Child's School Asthma Action Plan?

Your child's school asthma action plan should include:

Include a list of triggers that make your child's asthma worse, such as:

Provide details about your child's asthma medicines and how to take them, including:

Lastly, your child's provider and parent or guardian's signatures should be on the action plan as well.

Who Should Have a Copy of Your Child's School Asthma Action Plan?

These staff should each have a copy of your child's asthma action plan:

Related Information

Asthma
Asthma in children
Asthma and allergy resources
Wheezing
Asthma - child - discharge
Asthma - control drugs
Asthma - quick-relief drugs
Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction
Exercising and asthma at school
Make peak flow a habit
Signs of an asthma attack
Stay away from asthma triggers
Asthma in children - what to ask your doctor

References

Bergstrom J, Kurth SM, Bruhl E, et al. Institute for Clinical Systems Improvement. Health Care Guideline: Diagnosis and Management of Asthma. 11th ed. www.icsi.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/Asthma.pdf. Updated December 2016. Accessed January 22, 2020.

Jackson DJ, Lemanske RF, Bacharier LB. Management of asthma in infants and children. In: Burks AW, Holgate ST, O'Hehir RE, et al, eds. Middleton's Allergy: Principles and Practice. 9th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2020:chap 50.

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Review Date: 1/13/2020  

Reviewed By: Laura J. Martin, MD, MPH, ABIM Board Certified in Internal Medicine and Hospice and Palliative Medicine, Atlanta, GA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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