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Facial paralysis

Paralysis of the face

Facial paralysis occurs when a person is no longer able to move some or all of the muscles on one or both sides of the face.

Images

Ptosis - drooping of the eyelid
Facial drooping

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Causes

Facial paralysis is almost always caused by:

In people who are otherwise healthy, facial paralysis is often due to Bell palsy. This is a condition in which the facial nerve becomes inflamed.

Stroke may cause facial paralysis. With a stroke, other muscles on one side of the body may also be involved.

Facial paralysis that is due to a brain tumor usually develops slowly. Symptoms can include headaches, seizures, or hearing loss.

In newborns, facial paralysis may be caused by trauma during birth.

Other causes include:

Home Care

Follow your health care provider's instructions on how to take care of yourself at home. Take any medicines as directed.

If the eye cannot fully close, the cornea must be protected from drying out with prescription eye drops or gel.

When to Contact a Medical Professional

Call your provider if you have weakness or numbness in your face. Seek emergency medical help right away if you have these symptoms along with a severe headache, seizure, or blindness.

What to Expect at Your Office Visit

The provider will perform a physical exam and ask questions about your medical history and symptoms, including:

Tests that may be ordered include:

Treatment depends on the cause. Follow your provider's treatment recommendations.

The provider may refer you to a physical, speech, or occupational therapist. If facial paralysis from Bell palsy lasts for more than 6 to 12 months, plastic surgery may be recommended to help the eye close and improve the appearance of the face.

Related Information

Bell palsy
Drooling
Watery eyes
Stroke
Brain tumor - children
Seizures
Facial nerve palsy due to birth trauma

References

Mattox DE, Vivas EX. Clinical disorders of the facial nerve. In: Flint PW, Francis HW, Haughey BH, et al, eds. Cummings Otolaryngology: Head & Neck Surgery. 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2021:chap 172.

Meyers SL. Acute facial paralysis. In: Kellerman RD, Rakel DP, eds. Conn's Current Therapy 2021. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2021:695-696.

Smith G, Shy ME. Peripheral neuropathies. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil Medicine. 26th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2020:chap 392.

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Review Date: 1/16/2021  

Reviewed By: Linda J. Vorvick, MD, Clinical Associate Professor, Department of Family Medicine, UW Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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