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Congenital heart defect - corrective surgery

Congenital heart surgery; Patent ductus arteriosus ligation; Hypoplastic left heart repair; Tetralogy of Fallot repair; Coarctation of the aorta repair; Atrial septal defect repair; Ventricular septal defect repair; Truncus arteriosus repair; Total anomalous pulmonary artery correction; Transposition of great vessels repair; Tricuspid atresia repair; VSD repair; ASD repair

Congenital heart defect corrective surgery fixes or treats a heart defect that a child is born with. A baby born with one or more heart defects has congenital heart disease. Surgery is needed if the defect could harm the child's long-term health or well-being.

Images

Heart - section through the middle
Cardiac catheterization
Heart - front view
Ultrasound, normal fetus - heartbeat
Ultrasound, ventricular septal defect - heartbeat
Infant open heart surgery

Presentation

Patent ductus arteriosis (PDA) - series - Infant heart anatomy

Description

There are many types of pediatric heart surgery.

Patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) ligation:

Coarctation of the aorta repair:

Atrial septal defect (ASD) repair:

Ventricular septal defect (VSD) repair:

Tetralogy of Fallot repair:

The surgery involves:

The child may have a shunt procedure done first. A shunt moves blood from one area to another. This is done if the open-heart surgery needs to be delayed because the child is too sick to go through surgery.

Transposition of the great vessels repair:

Truncus arteriosus repair:

Tricuspid atresia repair:

Total anomalous pulmonary venous return (TAPVR) correction:

Hypoplastic left heart repair:

Related Information

Congenital heart disease
Cardiovascular
Patent ductus arteriosus
Coarctation of the aorta
Atrial septal defect (ASD)
Cardiac catheterization
Ventricular septal defect
Tetralogy of Fallot
Transposition of the great arteries
Truncus arteriosus
Tricuspid atresia
Total anomalous pulmonary venous return
Hypoplastic left heart syndrome
Heart transplant
Blue discoloration of the skin
Breathing difficulty
Heart failure
Pulse
Arrhythmias
Pediatric heart surgery
Aortic valve surgery - open
Pediatric heart surgery - discharge
Bringing your child to visit a very ill sibling
Surgical wound care - open
Bathroom safety - children

References

Bernstein D. General principles of treatment of congenital heart disease. In: Kliegman RM, St. Geme JW, Blum NJ, Shah SS, Tasker RC, Wilson KM, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics. 21st ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2020:chap 461.

Bhatt AB, Foster E, Kuehl K, et al; American Heart Association Council on Clinical Cardiology. Congenital heart disease in the older adult: a scientific statement from the American Heart Association. Circulation. 2015;131(21):1884-1931. PMID: 25896865 pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/25896865/.

LeRoy S, Elixson EM, O'Brien P, et al; American Heart Association Pediatric Nursing Subcommittee of the Council on Cardiovascular Nursing; Council on Cardiovascular Diseases of the Young. Recommendations for preparing children and adolescents for invasive cardiac procedures: a statement from the American Heart Association Pediatric Nursing Subcommittee of the Council on Cardiovascular Nursing in collaboration with the Council on Cardiovascular Diseases of the Young. Circulation. 2003;108(20):2250-2564. PMID: 14623793 pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/14623793/.

Webb GD, Smallhorn JF, Therrien J, Redington AN. Congenital heart disease. In: Zipes DP, Libby P, Bonow RO, Mann DL, Tomaselli GF, Braunwald E, eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine. 11th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2019:chap 75.

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Review Date: 2/11/2020  

Reviewed By: Todd Campbell, MD, FACS, Clinical Assistant Professor Department of Surgery, Volunteer Faculty, Rowan University School of Osteopathic Medicine, Stratford, NJ; Medical Director, Independence Blue Cross. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Internal review and update on 06/03/2021 by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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