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Brain tumor - children

Glioblastoma multiforme - children; Ependymoma - children; Glioma - children; Astrocytoma - children; Medulloblastoma - children; Neuroglioma - children; Oligodendroglioma - children; Meningioma - children; Cancer - brain tumor (children)

A brain tumor is a group (mass) of abnormal cells that grow in the brain. This article focuses on primary brain tumors in children.

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  • Brain tumor

    Brain tumor

    Brain tumors are classified depending on the exact site of the tumor, the type of tissue involved, benign or malignant tendencies of the tumor, and other factors. Primary brain tumors can arise from the brain cells, the meninges (membranes around the brain), nerves, or glands.

    Brain tumor

    illustration

  • Primary brain tumor

    Primary brain tumor

    A primary brain tumor is a mass created by the growth or uncontrolled proliferation of cells in the brain.

    Primary brain tumor

    illustration

  • Wilms tumor

    Wilms tumor

    Wilms tumor is a cancerous tumor of the kidney that occurs in children.

    Wilms tumor

    illustration

  • Children's diets

    Children's diets

    Children require a wide variety of foods in their diet so that they can acquire all of the nutrients needed to grow healthy and strong. One important element in the diet of children is the proper amount of fat. Children under two years of age should not be on a fat-restricted diet, because cholesterol and fat are thought to be important nutrients for brain development. Children over two can have lower fat foods added to their diets. Fat in the diet is necessary to help absorb some of the vitamins, including vitamin A, vitamin D, vitamin E, and vitamin K.

    Children's diets

    illustration

    • Brain tumor

      Brain tumor

      Brain tumors are classified depending on the exact site of the tumor, the type of tissue involved, benign or malignant tendencies of the tumor, and other factors. Primary brain tumors can arise from the brain cells, the meninges (membranes around the brain), nerves, or glands.

      Brain tumor

      illustration

    • Primary brain tumor

      Primary brain tumor

      A primary brain tumor is a mass created by the growth or uncontrolled proliferation of cells in the brain.

      Primary brain tumor

      illustration

    • Wilms tumor

      Wilms tumor

      Wilms tumor is a cancerous tumor of the kidney that occurs in children.

      Wilms tumor

      illustration

    • Children's diets

      Children's diets

      Children require a wide variety of foods in their diet so that they can acquire all of the nutrients needed to grow healthy and strong. One important element in the diet of children is the proper amount of fat. Children under two years of age should not be on a fat-restricted diet, because cholesterol and fat are thought to be important nutrients for brain development. Children over two can have lower fat foods added to their diets. Fat in the diet is necessary to help absorb some of the vitamins, including vitamin A, vitamin D, vitamin E, and vitamin K.

      Children's diets

      illustration

    Brain tumor - children

    Glioblastoma multiforme - children; Ependymoma - children; Glioma - children; Astrocytoma - children; Medulloblastoma - children; Neuroglioma - children; Oligodendroglioma - children; Meningioma - children; Cancer - brain tumor (children)

    A brain tumor is a group (mass) of abnormal cells that grow in the brain. This article focuses on primary brain tumors in children.

    Read Full Article

     
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    Brain tumor - children

    Glioblastoma multiforme - children; Ependymoma - children; Glioma - children; Astrocytoma - children; Medulloblastoma - children; Neuroglioma - children; Oligodendroglioma - children; Meningioma - children; Cancer - brain tumor (children)

    A brain tumor is a group (mass) of abnormal cells that grow in the brain. This article focuses on primary brain tumors in children.

    Read Full Article

     

    Review Date: 7/12/2019

    Reviewed By: Adam S. Levy, MD, Division of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, The Children's Hospital at Montefiore, Bronx, NY. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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