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  • Intra-abdominal abscess - CT scan

    Intra-abdominal abscess - CT scan

    CT scan of the pelvis showing a large intra-abdominal mass.

    Intra-abdominal abscess - CT scan

    illustration

  • Tooth abscess

    Tooth abscess

    A collection of infected material (pus) resulting from bacterial infection of the center (pulp) of a tooth.

    Tooth abscess

    illustration

  • Pyogenic abscess

    Pyogenic abscess

    A liver abscess can develop from several different sources, including a blood infection, an abdominal infection, or an abdominal injury which has been become infected. The most common infecting bacteria include E coli, enterococcus, staphylococcus, and streptococcus. Treatment is usually a combination of drainage and prolonged antibiotic therapy.

    Pyogenic abscess

    illustration

  • Bartholin cyst or abscess

    Bartholin cyst or abscess

    Bartholin glands are found on each side of the vaginal opening. A Bartholin cyst is a buildup of fluid that occurs if the opening of the gland is blocked. A Bartholin abscess may occur if the cyst fluid becomes infected. The Bartholin cyst or abscess appears as a lump or swelling on the side of the vaginal opening.

    Bartholin cyst or abscess

    illustration

  • Amebic liver abscess

    Amebic liver abscess

    Amebic liver abscess is a collection of pus in the liver in response to an intestinal parasite called Entamoeba histolytica. This parasite causes amebiasis, an intestinal infection that is also called amebic dysentery. After an infection has occurred, the parasite may be carried by the bloodstream from the intestines to the liver.

    Amebic liver abscess

    illustration

  • Amebic brain abscess

    Amebic brain abscess

    Amebiasis, normally an infection of the intestinal tract, may spread and infect other organs such as the liver or brain. Infection of the brain can be fatal. In this slide, ameba are shown in a sample of brain tissue. Ameba represent a serious infection in immunocompromised individuals. (Image courtesy of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. )

    Amebic brain abscess

    illustration

    • Intra-abdominal abscess - CT scan

      Intra-abdominal abscess - CT scan

      CT scan of the pelvis showing a large intra-abdominal mass.

      Intra-abdominal abscess - CT scan

      illustration

    • Tooth abscess

      Tooth abscess

      A collection of infected material (pus) resulting from bacterial infection of the center (pulp) of a tooth.

      Tooth abscess

      illustration

    • Pyogenic abscess

      Pyogenic abscess

      A liver abscess can develop from several different sources, including a blood infection, an abdominal infection, or an abdominal injury which has been become infected. The most common infecting bacteria include E coli, enterococcus, staphylococcus, and streptococcus. Treatment is usually a combination of drainage and prolonged antibiotic therapy.

      Pyogenic abscess

      illustration

    • Bartholin cyst or abscess

      Bartholin cyst or abscess

      Bartholin glands are found on each side of the vaginal opening. A Bartholin cyst is a buildup of fluid that occurs if the opening of the gland is blocked. A Bartholin abscess may occur if the cyst fluid becomes infected. The Bartholin cyst or abscess appears as a lump or swelling on the side of the vaginal opening.

      Bartholin cyst or abscess

      illustration

    • Amebic liver abscess

      Amebic liver abscess

      Amebic liver abscess is a collection of pus in the liver in response to an intestinal parasite called Entamoeba histolytica. This parasite causes amebiasis, an intestinal infection that is also called amebic dysentery. After an infection has occurred, the parasite may be carried by the bloodstream from the intestines to the liver.

      Amebic liver abscess

      illustration

    • Amebic brain abscess

      Amebic brain abscess

      Amebiasis, normally an infection of the intestinal tract, may spread and infect other organs such as the liver or brain. Infection of the brain can be fatal. In this slide, ameba are shown in a sample of brain tissue. Ameba represent a serious infection in immunocompromised individuals. (Image courtesy of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. )

      Amebic brain abscess

      illustration


    Review Date: 10/25/2020

    Reviewed By: Jatin M. Vyas, MD, PhD, Assistant Professor in Medicine, Harvard Medical School; Assistant in Medicine, Division of Infectious Disease, Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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