Dermatitis

Skin disorders - dermatitis

Dermatitis is an itchy inflammation of the skin. It is not contagious or dangerous, but it can be uncomfortable. There are many types of dermatitis, including allergic dermatitis, eczema, and seborrheic dermatitis (which causes dandruff). Eczema is a chronic condition, and symptoms may come and go.

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  • Atopic dermatitis - Animation

    Atopic dermatitis

    Animation

  • Atopic dermatitis - Animation

    Your skin used to be soft and smooth, but now it's itchy and scaly. It's gotten so bad that you're wearing long sleeves every time you go out, even in the summer. There's a chance you could have eczema, and if you do, there are treatments to smooth out your skin and get you back into t-shirts again. Eczema is like an allergic reaction on your skin. Instead of your eyes watering or your nose running, your skin swells up in response to an allergy trigger. A lot of people who have eczema also have allergies to pollen, mold, animal fur, dust, or sensitivities to products they use around the house. It could be that the detergent you're using or the perfume you're wearing is leaving its mark on your skin. To know if you have eczema, when you look at your skin, you'll see redness, dryness and maybe swelling, and blisters that may ooze or crust over. In babies and young kids, you'll see these sores mainly on the face, scalp, hands, and feet. In older kids and adults, the spots are typically on the insides of the knees and elbows, as well as on the neck, hands, and feet. But really, if you're having a bad eczema flare-up, you might see red patches on any part of your body. Eczema patches get so itchy that you'll probably be tempted to scratch at them. After a lot of scratching, they'll get red, thick, and irritated. Your doctor should be able to tell that you have eczema just by looking at your skin. If allergies are causing your eczema, you may need allergy tests to find out just what's setting off your skin reaction. To treat Eczema, you can apply creams or lotions to soothe and moisturize your skin. Just pick a product that's free from dyes and scents, which could irritate your skin even more. Your doctor can also prescribe a steroid cream or ointment to relieve the swelling. Medicines called antihistamines can calm the reaction that's causing your eczema and relieve the itchiness. There are a number of other eczema treatments if these don't work for you. Eczema is a chronic condition. Although kids usually outgrow it by age 5 or 6, most adults tend to get stuck with it for a long time. When you've got an eczema flare-up it will be itchy, but try not to scratch. You could give yourself an infection, or leave your skin permanently scarred. Instead, keep your skin moisturized and avoid whatever trigger is causing your eczema.

  • Dermatitis - contact

    Dermatitis - contact

    This picture shows a skin inflammation (dermatitis) caused by contact with a material that causes an allergic reaction in this person. Contact dermatitis is a relatively common condition, and can be caused by many substances.

    Dermatitis - contact

    illustration

  • Dermatitis - contact on the cheek

    Dermatitis - contact on the cheek

    This picture shows a person with a skin inflammation (dermatitis) on the cheek caused by contact with a substance that produced an allergic reaction (allergen). Contact dermatitis causes redness, itching, and small blisters (vesicles).

    Dermatitis - contact on the cheek

    illustration

  • Dermatitis - herpetiformis on the arm and legs

    Dermatitis - herpetiformis on the arm and legs

    This picture shows a chronic inflammatory disease (dermatitis herpetiformis) that produces red (erythematous), raised (papular), small or large blisters (vesicles or bullae) that burn and itch intensely. Dermatitis herpetiformis develops suddenly, lasts for weeks to months, and may be associated with digestive diseases (such as Celiac disease).

    Dermatitis - herpetiformis on the arm and legs

    illustration

  • Dermatitis - herpetiformis on the knee

    Dermatitis - herpetiformis on the knee

    This picture shows the knee of a person with a chronic inflammatory disease known as dermatitis herpetiformis. It produces red, raised (papular), small or large blisters (vesicles or bullae) that burn and itch intensely. Dermatitis herpetiformis develops suddenly, lasts for weeks to months, and may be associated with digestive diseases (such as Celiac disease).

    Dermatitis - herpetiformis on the knee

    illustration

  • Dermatitis - reaction to tinea

    Dermatitis - reaction to tinea

    This picture shows a skin inflammation of the fingers with multiple blisters (vesicles) caused by an allergic reaction to a fungal infection (tinea corporis). (Image courtesy of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. )

    Dermatitis - reaction to tinea

    illustration

  • Dermatitis, herpetiformis - close-up of lesion

    Dermatitis, herpetiformis - close-up of lesion

    Dermatitis herpetiformis is a chronic inflammatory disease that produces lesions that burn and itch intensely. This is a close-up of dermatitis herpetiformis lesions. The lesions are red (erythematous) and may be slightly raised (papular), form small pus-filled areas (pustules), or there may be blisters (vesicles). The disease develops suddenly and may last from weeks to months. It may occur in association with gluten (wheat) sensitivity and allergy.

    Dermatitis, herpetiformis - close-up of lesion

    illustration

  • Dermatitis herpetiformis on the forearm

    Dermatitis herpetiformis on the forearm

    This picture shows the forearm of a person with a chronic inflammatory disease known as dermatitis herpetiformis. It produces red, raised (papular), small or large blisters (vesicles or bullae) that burn and itch intensely. Dermatitis herpetiformis develops suddenly, lasts for weeks to months, and may be associated with digestive diseases such as celiac disease.

    Dermatitis herpetiformis on the forearm

    illustration

  • Dermatitis herpetiformis on the hand

    Dermatitis herpetiformis on the hand

    This picture shows the fingers of a person with a chronic inflammatory disease known as dermatitis herpetiformis. It produces red, raised (papular), small or large blisters (vesicles or bullae) that burn and itch intensely. Dermatitis herpetiformis develops suddenly, lasts for weeks to months, and may be associated with digestive diseases such as celiac disease.

    Dermatitis herpetiformis on the hand

    illustration

  • Dermatitis herpetiformis on the thumb

    Dermatitis herpetiformis on the thumb

    This picture shows the thumb of a person with a chronic inflammatory disease known as dermatitis herpetiformis. It produces red, raised (papular), small or large blisters (vesicles or bullae) that burn and itch intensely. Dermatitis herpetiformis develops suddenly, lasts for weeks to months, and may be associated with digestive diseases such as celiac disease.

    Dermatitis herpetiformis on the thumb

    illustration

  • Dermatitis seborrheic - close-up

    Dermatitis seborrheic - close-up

    This is a close-up of seborrheic dermatitis. Note the redness (erythema) and mild scaling. Individuals with AIDS frequently develop seborrheic dermatitis or other types of skin rashes, as seen in this person.

    Dermatitis seborrheic - close-up

    illustration

  • Atopic dermatitis - Animation

    Atopic dermatitis

    Animation

  • Atopic dermatitis - Animation

    Your skin used to be soft and smooth, but now it's itchy and scaly. It's gotten so bad that you're wearing long sleeves every time you go out, even in the summer. There's a chance you could have eczema, and if you do, there are treatments to smooth out your skin and get you back into t-shirts again. Eczema is like an allergic reaction on your skin. Instead of your eyes watering or your nose running, your skin swells up in response to an allergy trigger. A lot of people who have eczema also have allergies to pollen, mold, animal fur, dust, or sensitivities to products they use around the house. It could be that the detergent you're using or the perfume you're wearing is leaving its mark on your skin. To know if you have eczema, when you look at your skin, you'll see redness, dryness and maybe swelling, and blisters that may ooze or crust over. In babies and young kids, you'll see these sores mainly on the face, scalp, hands, and feet. In older kids and adults, the spots are typically on the insides of the knees and elbows, as well as on the neck, hands, and feet. But really, if you're having a bad eczema flare-up, you might see red patches on any part of your body. Eczema patches get so itchy that you'll probably be tempted to scratch at them. After a lot of scratching, they'll get red, thick, and irritated. Your doctor should be able to tell that you have eczema just by looking at your skin. If allergies are causing your eczema, you may need allergy tests to find out just what's setting off your skin reaction. To treat Eczema, you can apply creams or lotions to soothe and moisturize your skin. Just pick a product that's free from dyes and scents, which could irritate your skin even more. Your doctor can also prescribe a steroid cream or ointment to relieve the swelling. Medicines called antihistamines can calm the reaction that's causing your eczema and relieve the itchiness. There are a number of other eczema treatments if these don't work for you. Eczema is a chronic condition. Although kids usually outgrow it by age 5 or 6, most adults tend to get stuck with it for a long time. When you've got an eczema flare-up it will be itchy, but try not to scratch. You could give yourself an infection, or leave your skin permanently scarred. Instead, keep your skin moisturized and avoid whatever trigger is causing your eczema.

  • Dermatitis - contact

    Dermatitis - contact

    This picture shows a skin inflammation (dermatitis) caused by contact with a material that causes an allergic reaction in this person. Contact dermatitis is a relatively common condition, and can be caused by many substances.

    Dermatitis - contact

    illustration

  • Dermatitis - contact on the cheek

    Dermatitis - contact on the cheek

    This picture shows a person with a skin inflammation (dermatitis) on the cheek caused by contact with a substance that produced an allergic reaction (allergen). Contact dermatitis causes redness, itching, and small blisters (vesicles).

    Dermatitis - contact on the cheek

    illustration

  • Dermatitis - herpetiformis on the arm and legs

    Dermatitis - herpetiformis on the arm and legs

    This picture shows a chronic inflammatory disease (dermatitis herpetiformis) that produces red (erythematous), raised (papular), small or large blisters (vesicles or bullae) that burn and itch intensely. Dermatitis herpetiformis develops suddenly, lasts for weeks to months, and may be associated with digestive diseases (such as Celiac disease).

    Dermatitis - herpetiformis on the arm and legs

    illustration

  • Dermatitis - herpetiformis on the knee

    Dermatitis - herpetiformis on the knee

    This picture shows the knee of a person with a chronic inflammatory disease known as dermatitis herpetiformis. It produces red, raised (papular), small or large blisters (vesicles or bullae) that burn and itch intensely. Dermatitis herpetiformis develops suddenly, lasts for weeks to months, and may be associated with digestive diseases (such as Celiac disease).

    Dermatitis - herpetiformis on the knee

    illustration

  • Dermatitis - reaction to tinea

    Dermatitis - reaction to tinea

    This picture shows a skin inflammation of the fingers with multiple blisters (vesicles) caused by an allergic reaction to a fungal infection (tinea corporis). (Image courtesy of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. )

    Dermatitis - reaction to tinea

    illustration

  • Dermatitis, herpetiformis - close-up of lesion

    Dermatitis, herpetiformis - close-up of lesion

    Dermatitis herpetiformis is a chronic inflammatory disease that produces lesions that burn and itch intensely. This is a close-up of dermatitis herpetiformis lesions. The lesions are red (erythematous) and may be slightly raised (papular), form small pus-filled areas (pustules), or there may be blisters (vesicles). The disease develops suddenly and may last from weeks to months. It may occur in association with gluten (wheat) sensitivity and allergy.

    Dermatitis, herpetiformis - close-up of lesion

    illustration

  • Dermatitis herpetiformis on the forearm

    Dermatitis herpetiformis on the forearm

    This picture shows the forearm of a person with a chronic inflammatory disease known as dermatitis herpetiformis. It produces red, raised (papular), small or large blisters (vesicles or bullae) that burn and itch intensely. Dermatitis herpetiformis develops suddenly, lasts for weeks to months, and may be associated with digestive diseases such as celiac disease.

    Dermatitis herpetiformis on the forearm

    illustration

  • Dermatitis herpetiformis on the hand

    Dermatitis herpetiformis on the hand

    This picture shows the fingers of a person with a chronic inflammatory disease known as dermatitis herpetiformis. It produces red, raised (papular), small or large blisters (vesicles or bullae) that burn and itch intensely. Dermatitis herpetiformis develops suddenly, lasts for weeks to months, and may be associated with digestive diseases such as celiac disease.

    Dermatitis herpetiformis on the hand

    illustration

  • Dermatitis herpetiformis on the thumb

    Dermatitis herpetiformis on the thumb

    This picture shows the thumb of a person with a chronic inflammatory disease known as dermatitis herpetiformis. It produces red, raised (papular), small or large blisters (vesicles or bullae) that burn and itch intensely. Dermatitis herpetiformis develops suddenly, lasts for weeks to months, and may be associated with digestive diseases such as celiac disease.

    Dermatitis herpetiformis on the thumb

    illustration

  • Dermatitis seborrheic - close-up

    Dermatitis seborrheic - close-up

    This is a close-up of seborrheic dermatitis. Note the redness (erythema) and mild scaling. Individuals with AIDS frequently develop seborrheic dermatitis or other types of skin rashes, as seen in this person.

    Dermatitis seborrheic - close-up

    illustration


Review Date: 4/1/2016

Reviewed By: Steven D. Ehrlich, NMD, Solutions Acupuncture, a private practice specializing in complementary and alternative medicine, Phoenix, AZ. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network.

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