CT scan

CAT scan; Computed axial tomography scan; Computed tomography scan

A computed tomography (CT) scan is an imaging method that uses x-rays to create pictures of cross-sections of the body. Related tests include:Abdominal and pelvis CT scanCranial or head CT scanCervical, thoracic, and lumbosacral spine CT scanOrbit CT scanChest CT scan

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  • CT scan

    CT scan

    CT stands for computerized tomography. In this procedure, a thin X-ray beam is rotated around the area of the body to be visualized. Using very complicated mathematical processes called algorithms, the computer is able to generate a 3-D image of a section through the body. CT scans are very detailed and provide excellent information for the physician.

    CT scan

    illustration

  • CT scan of the brain

    CT scan of the brain

    A CT or CAT scan (computed tomography) is a much more sensitive imaging technique than x-ray, allowing high definition not only of the bony structures, but of the soft tissues. Clear images of organs such as the brain, muscles, joint structures, veins and arteries, as well as anomalies like tumors and hemorrhages may be obtained with or without the injection of contrasting dye.

    CT scan of the brain

    illustration

  • Intracerebellar hemorrhage - CT scan

    Intracerebellar hemorrhage - CT scan

    Intracerebellar hemorrhage shown by CT scan. This hemorrhage followed use of t-PA.

    Intracerebellar hemorrhage - CT scan

    illustration

  • Pulmonary nodule, solitary - CT scan

    Pulmonary nodule, solitary - CT scan

    This CT scan shows a single lesion (pulmonary nodule) in the right lung. This nodule is seen as the light circle in the upper portion of the dark area on the left side of the picture. A normal lung would look completely black in a CT scan.

    Pulmonary nodule, solitary - CT scan

    illustration

  • Thyroid cancer - CT scan

    Thyroid cancer - CT scan

    This CT scan of the upper chest (thorax) shows a malignant thyroid tumor (cancer). The dark area around the trachea (marked by the white U-shaped tip of the respiratory tube) is an area where normal tissue has been eroded and died (necrosis) as a result of tumor growth.

    Thyroid cancer - CT scan

    illustration

  • Thyroid cancer - CT scan

    Thyroid cancer - CT scan

    This CT scan shows a thyroid cancer tumor in the throat, encircling, narrowing, and displacing the windpipe (trachea).

    Thyroid cancer - CT scan

    illustration

  • Hepatocellular cancer - CT scan

    Hepatocellular cancer - CT scan

    A CT scan of the upper abdomen showing a widespread (disseminated) carcinoma of the liver (hepato cellular carcinoma). The liver is the large organ on the left side of the picture. Note the moth-eaten appearance.

    Hepatocellular cancer - CT scan

    illustration

  • Liver cirrhosis - CT scan

    Liver cirrhosis - CT scan

    A CT scan of the upper abdomen showing cirrhosis of the liver.

    Liver cirrhosis - CT scan

    illustration

  • Liver metastases, CT scan

    Liver metastases, CT scan

    A CT scan of the upper abdomen showing multiple metastasis (cancer that has spread) in the liver of a patient with carcinoma of the large bowel. Note the dark areas in the liver (left side and center of picture).

    Liver metastases, CT scan

    illustration

  • Liver with disproportional fattening - CT scan

    Liver with disproportional fattening - CT scan

    A CT scan of the upper abdomen showing disproportional steatosis (fattening) of the liver.

    Liver with disproportional fattening - CT scan

    illustration

    • CT scan

      CT scan

      CT stands for computerized tomography. In this procedure, a thin X-ray beam is rotated around the area of the body to be visualized. Using very complicated mathematical processes called algorithms, the computer is able to generate a 3-D image of a section through the body. CT scans are very detailed and provide excellent information for the physician.

      CT scan

      illustration

    • CT scan of the brain

      CT scan of the brain

      A CT or CAT scan (computed tomography) is a much more sensitive imaging technique than x-ray, allowing high definition not only of the bony structures, but of the soft tissues. Clear images of organs such as the brain, muscles, joint structures, veins and arteries, as well as anomalies like tumors and hemorrhages may be obtained with or without the injection of contrasting dye.

      CT scan of the brain

      illustration

    • Intracerebellar hemorrhage - CT scan

      Intracerebellar hemorrhage - CT scan

      Intracerebellar hemorrhage shown by CT scan. This hemorrhage followed use of t-PA.

      Intracerebellar hemorrhage - CT scan

      illustration

    • Pulmonary nodule, solitary - CT scan

      Pulmonary nodule, solitary - CT scan

      This CT scan shows a single lesion (pulmonary nodule) in the right lung. This nodule is seen as the light circle in the upper portion of the dark area on the left side of the picture. A normal lung would look completely black in a CT scan.

      Pulmonary nodule, solitary - CT scan

      illustration

    • Thyroid cancer - CT scan

      Thyroid cancer - CT scan

      This CT scan of the upper chest (thorax) shows a malignant thyroid tumor (cancer). The dark area around the trachea (marked by the white U-shaped tip of the respiratory tube) is an area where normal tissue has been eroded and died (necrosis) as a result of tumor growth.

      Thyroid cancer - CT scan

      illustration

    • Thyroid cancer - CT scan

      Thyroid cancer - CT scan

      This CT scan shows a thyroid cancer tumor in the throat, encircling, narrowing, and displacing the windpipe (trachea).

      Thyroid cancer - CT scan

      illustration

    • Hepatocellular cancer - CT scan

      Hepatocellular cancer - CT scan

      A CT scan of the upper abdomen showing a widespread (disseminated) carcinoma of the liver (hepato cellular carcinoma). The liver is the large organ on the left side of the picture. Note the moth-eaten appearance.

      Hepatocellular cancer - CT scan

      illustration

    • Liver cirrhosis - CT scan

      Liver cirrhosis - CT scan

      A CT scan of the upper abdomen showing cirrhosis of the liver.

      Liver cirrhosis - CT scan

      illustration

    • Liver metastases, CT scan

      Liver metastases, CT scan

      A CT scan of the upper abdomen showing multiple metastasis (cancer that has spread) in the liver of a patient with carcinoma of the large bowel. Note the dark areas in the liver (left side and center of picture).

      Liver metastases, CT scan

      illustration

    • Liver with disproportional fattening - CT scan

      Liver with disproportional fattening - CT scan

      A CT scan of the upper abdomen showing disproportional steatosis (fattening) of the liver.

      Liver with disproportional fattening - CT scan

      illustration


    Review Date: 6/25/2018

    Reviewed By: Jason Levy, MD, Northside Radiology Associates, Atlanta, GA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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