Spinal stenosis

Pseudo-claudication; Central spinal stenosis; Foraminal spinal stenosis; Degenerative spine disease; Back pain - spinal stenosis; Low back pain - stenosis; LBP - stenosis

Spinal stenosis is narrowing of the spinal column that causes pressure on the spinal cord, or narrowing of the openings (called neural foramina) where spinal nerves leave the spinal column.

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  • Ankylosing spondylitis - Animation

    Ankylosing spondylitis

    Animation

  • Ankylosing spondylitis - Animation

    If you have pain and stiffness in your lower back and hips that comes and goes, you may have something called ankylosing spondylitis. Let's talk today about this condition. Ankylosing spondylitis is a long-term disease that causes inflammation of the joints between your spinal bones, as well as the joints between your spine and pelvis. We don't really know what causes it, but we think that genes play a role. We do know the disease mostly affects men, usually beginning between ages 20 and 40. It also seems to run in families. Eventually, the disease can cause spinal bones to join together, causing people to lose the ability to move their lower spine. If you have ankylosing spondylitis, you may have pain and stiffness at night, in the morning, or when you're not active. The pain may begin in the joints between your pelvis and spine and then move along your spine. Your pain may get better with movement or exercise. So, what can you do about ankylosing spondylitis?Well, your doctor will probably want you to have a number of blood and imaging tests to confirm the diagnosis. For pain, the doctor may prescribe nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) like ibuprofen. You may need to take medicines such as prednisone or other medicines to suppress your immune system. Another medicine, called a TNF-inhibitor, can block an inflammatory protein in your body and greatly improve the symptoms of ankylosing spondylitis. Ask your doctor about exercises that can help improve your posture. Lying flat on your back at night can also help your posture. Eventually, if your pain or joint damage is bad enough, you may need surgery. The course of this disease is different for everyone. For some people, symptoms may come and go at any time. The good news is that most people can function and lead a productive life unless the disease is very bad in their hips.

  • Lumbar puncture (spinal tap)

    Lumbar puncture (spinal tap)

    A lumbar puncture, or spinal tap, is a procedure to collect cerebrospinal fluid to check for the presence of disease or injury. A spinal needle is inserted, usually between the third and fourth lumbar vertebrae in the lower spine. Once the needle is properly positioned in the subarachnoid space (the space between the spinal cord and its covering, the meninges), pressures can be measured and fluid can be collected for testing.

    Lumbar puncture (spinal tap)

    illustration

  • Ultrasound, normal fetus - spine and ribs

    Ultrasound, normal fetus - spine and ribs

    This is a normal fetal ultrasound performed at 30 weeks gestation. In the middle of the screen, a clear outline of the spine and ribs is visible. The cross hair is between two ribs just above the spine.

    Ultrasound, normal fetus - spine and ribs

    illustration

  • Spine supporting structures

    Spine supporting structures

    The spine is surrounded by many muscles and ligaments which give it great strength and flexibility. If these muscles or ligaments become damaged, back pain results.

    Spine supporting structures

    illustration

  • Changes in spine with age

    Changes in spine with age

    The spine weakens with age, becoming more curved and more fragile.

    Changes in spine with age

    illustration

  • Spinal surgery - cervical - series

    Spinal surgery - cervical - series

    Presentation

  • Lumbar spinal surgery  - series

    Lumbar spinal surgery - series

    Presentation

  • Knee joint replacement  - series

    Knee joint replacement - series

    Presentation

  • Lumbar spinal surgery - series

    Lumbar spinal surgery - series

    Presentation

  • Knee joint replacement  - series

    Knee joint replacement - series

    Presentation

  • Ankylosing spondylitis - Animation

    Ankylosing spondylitis

    Animation

  • Ankylosing spondylitis - Animation

    If you have pain and stiffness in your lower back and hips that comes and goes, you may have something called ankylosing spondylitis. Let's talk today about this condition. Ankylosing spondylitis is a long-term disease that causes inflammation of the joints between your spinal bones, as well as the joints between your spine and pelvis. We don't really know what causes it, but we think that genes play a role. We do know the disease mostly affects men, usually beginning between ages 20 and 40. It also seems to run in families. Eventually, the disease can cause spinal bones to join together, causing people to lose the ability to move their lower spine. If you have ankylosing spondylitis, you may have pain and stiffness at night, in the morning, or when you're not active. The pain may begin in the joints between your pelvis and spine and then move along your spine. Your pain may get better with movement or exercise. So, what can you do about ankylosing spondylitis?Well, your doctor will probably want you to have a number of blood and imaging tests to confirm the diagnosis. For pain, the doctor may prescribe nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) like ibuprofen. You may need to take medicines such as prednisone or other medicines to suppress your immune system. Another medicine, called a TNF-inhibitor, can block an inflammatory protein in your body and greatly improve the symptoms of ankylosing spondylitis. Ask your doctor about exercises that can help improve your posture. Lying flat on your back at night can also help your posture. Eventually, if your pain or joint damage is bad enough, you may need surgery. The course of this disease is different for everyone. For some people, symptoms may come and go at any time. The good news is that most people can function and lead a productive life unless the disease is very bad in their hips.

  • Lumbar puncture (spinal tap)

    Lumbar puncture (spinal tap)

    A lumbar puncture, or spinal tap, is a procedure to collect cerebrospinal fluid to check for the presence of disease or injury. A spinal needle is inserted, usually between the third and fourth lumbar vertebrae in the lower spine. Once the needle is properly positioned in the subarachnoid space (the space between the spinal cord and its covering, the meninges), pressures can be measured and fluid can be collected for testing.

    Lumbar puncture (spinal tap)

    illustration

  • Ultrasound, normal fetus - spine and ribs

    Ultrasound, normal fetus - spine and ribs

    This is a normal fetal ultrasound performed at 30 weeks gestation. In the middle of the screen, a clear outline of the spine and ribs is visible. The cross hair is between two ribs just above the spine.

    Ultrasound, normal fetus - spine and ribs

    illustration

  • Spine supporting structures

    Spine supporting structures

    The spine is surrounded by many muscles and ligaments which give it great strength and flexibility. If these muscles or ligaments become damaged, back pain results.

    Spine supporting structures

    illustration

  • Changes in spine with age

    Changes in spine with age

    The spine weakens with age, becoming more curved and more fragile.

    Changes in spine with age

    illustration

  • Spinal surgery - cervical - series

    Spinal surgery - cervical - series

    Presentation

  • Lumbar spinal surgery  - series

    Lumbar spinal surgery - series

    Presentation

  • Knee joint replacement  - series

    Knee joint replacement - series

    Presentation

  • Lumbar spinal surgery - series

    Lumbar spinal surgery - series

    Presentation

  • Knee joint replacement  - series

    Knee joint replacement - series

    Presentation


Review Date: 7/25/2020

Reviewed By: C. Benjamin Ma, MD, Professor, Chief, Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, UCSF Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, San Francisco, CA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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