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Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

Idiopathic diffuse interstitial pulmonary fibrosis; IPF; Pulmonary fibrosis; Cryptogenic fibrosing alveolitis; CFA; Fibrosing alveolitis; Usual interstitial pneumonitis; UIP

Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is scarring or thickening of the lungs without a known cause.

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  • Cystic fibrosis - Animation

    Cystic fibrosis

    Animation

  • Cystic fibrosis - Animation

    Parents can pass all kinds of different traits to their children, from blue eyes to blonde hair. Sometimes, parents can also pass the genes for certain diseases to their kids. Cystic fibrosis is one very serious inherited disease that makes it hard for children to breathe and digest food. Let's talk about cystic fibrosis. Genes are the coded instructions that tell our bodies how to operate. Usually, the code is correct and everything runs smoothly. But sometimes, the code is incorrect because of a defective gene or genes. In the case of cystic fibrosis, a faulty gene causes the body to produce an abnormally thick, sticky fluid called mucus. This mucus clogs the lungs, making it hard to breathe. It also gets stuck in the pancreas, making it harder for the body to break down and digest food. Millions of Americans carry the cystic fibrosis, or CF gene. Fortunately, most of them don't have cystic fibrosis. That's because you need to inherit one faulty gene from each parent to actually get the disease. Kids who are born with cystic fibrosis start showing signs very early. Newborns don't grow or gain weight as quickly as they should, and they don't make bowel movements because their bodies aren't digesting food properly. As these children get older, they may have symptoms like coughing and fatigue from the mucus in their lungs, and nausea and stomach pain from the mucus in their pancreas. They'll also get pneumonia and other lung infections more often than normal. So, you may now be asking, how do you know if your child has cystic fibrosis?Doctors diagnose cystic fibrosis using a blood test that looks for the CF gene. There is also a sweat test, which looks for saltier-than-normal sweat, another symptom of cystic fibrosis. Doctors may use other tests, such as a chest x-ray or upper GI series, to check for lung and bowel problems caused by CF. It's a good idea to get treated at a center that specializes in cystic fibrosis because they're up on all the latest therapies. For lung problems, treatments include inhaled medicines to open the airways, medicine to thin mucus and make it easier to cough up, and antibiotics to prevent lung infections. Some people may eventually need a lung transplant. For bowel problems, you'll need to eat a special diet that's higher in protein and calories to make up for the nutrients you're losing. You may also take vitamin supplements. The outlook for people with cystic fibrosis is better today than ever before. Thanks to new treatments, people with this disease can live well into adulthood. They can go to school, play sports, and get a job like everyone else. But because the symptoms of cystic fibrosis are so serious, it's very important to stay on top of treatment, and to call the doctor right away if symptoms get worse. Anyone with a family history of the disease may want to get screened for the CF gene before they decide to have children.

  • Postural drainage

    Postural drainage

    There are 6 to 12 positions a person with pulmonary disease may take to drain mucus from a certain part of the lungs. Another person may tap in certain areas to help loosen the mucus and allow it to be coughed out. Other ways to relieve the lung congestion of cystic fibrosis or bronchiectasis include percussion vests and inhaled aerosols.

    Postural drainage

    illustration

  • Cystic fibrosis

    Cystic fibrosis

    Cystic fibrosis is the most common cause of chronic lung disease in children and young adults, and the most common fatal hereditary disorder affecting white people in the United States.

    Cystic fibrosis

    illustration

  • Primary pulmonary hypertension

    Primary pulmonary hypertension

    Pulmonary hypertension is the narrowing of the pulmonary arterioles within the lung. The narrowing of the arteries creates resistance and an increased work load for the heart. The heart becomes enlarged from pumping blood against the resistance. Some symptoms include chest pain, weakness, shortness of breath, and fatigue. The goal of treatment is control of the symptoms, although the disease usually develops into congestive heart failure.

    Primary pulmonary hypertension

    illustration

  • Totally anomalous pulmonary venous return - x-ray

    Totally anomalous pulmonary venous return - x-ray

    Totally anomalous pulmonary venous return (TAPVR) is a form of congenital heart disease. This x-ray shows an enlarged heart, a large liver, and increased size of the lung blood vessels (pulmonary vascularity).

    Totally anomalous pulmonary venous return - x-ray

    illustration

  • Totally anomalous pulmonary venous return - X-ray

    Totally anomalous pulmonary venous return - X-ray

    Totally anomalous pulmonary venous return (TAPVR) is a form of congenital heart disease. This x-ray shows an enlarged heart, a large liver, and increased pulmonary vascularity.

    Totally anomalous pulmonary venous return - X-ray

    illustration

  • Pulmonary arteries

    Pulmonary arteries

    The pulmonary arteries take blood from the heart to the lungs.

    Pulmonary arteries

    illustration

  • COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder)

    COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder)

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) refers to chronic lung disorders that result in blocked air flow in the lungs. The two main COPD disorders are emphysema and chronic bronchitis, the most common causes of respiratory failure. Emphysema occurs when the walls between the lung's air sacs become weakened and collapse. Damage from COPD is usually permanent and irreversible.

    COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder)

    illustration

  • Pulmonary aspergillosis

    Pulmonary aspergillosis

    Aspergillosis is an acute pulmonary infection caused by the aspergillus fungus. Aspergillus can cause illness three ways: an allergic reaction in asthmatics; a colonization in scarred lung tissue; and an invasive infection with pneumonia which can affect the heart, lungs, brain and kidneys.

    Pulmonary aspergillosis

    illustration

  • Smoking and COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder)

    Smoking and COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder)

    Cigarettes contain many hazardous substances that damage the lung when inhaled, including tar, nicotine, carbon monoxide, and cyanide. Long-term exposure to secondhand tobacco smoke and/or repeated respiratory infections also can increase a person's risk for chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder.

    Smoking and COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder)

    illustration

  • Totally anomalous pulmonary venous return - X-ray

    Totally anomalous pulmonary venous return - X-ray

    Totally anomalous pulmonary venous return (TAPVR) is a form of congenital heart disease.

    Totally anomalous pulmonary venous return - X-ray

    illustration

  • Complete blood count - series

    Complete blood count - series

    Presentation

  • Lung transplant - series

    Lung transplant - series

    Presentation

  • Heart-lung transplant  - series

    Heart-lung transplant - series

    Presentation

  • Complete blood count - series

    Complete blood count - series

    Presentation

  • Cystic fibrosis - Animation

    Cystic fibrosis

    Animation

  • Cystic fibrosis - Animation

    Parents can pass all kinds of different traits to their children, from blue eyes to blonde hair. Sometimes, parents can also pass the genes for certain diseases to their kids. Cystic fibrosis is one very serious inherited disease that makes it hard for children to breathe and digest food. Let's talk about cystic fibrosis. Genes are the coded instructions that tell our bodies how to operate. Usually, the code is correct and everything runs smoothly. But sometimes, the code is incorrect because of a defective gene or genes. In the case of cystic fibrosis, a faulty gene causes the body to produce an abnormally thick, sticky fluid called mucus. This mucus clogs the lungs, making it hard to breathe. It also gets stuck in the pancreas, making it harder for the body to break down and digest food. Millions of Americans carry the cystic fibrosis, or CF gene. Fortunately, most of them don't have cystic fibrosis. That's because you need to inherit one faulty gene from each parent to actually get the disease. Kids who are born with cystic fibrosis start showing signs very early. Newborns don't grow or gain weight as quickly as they should, and they don't make bowel movements because their bodies aren't digesting food properly. As these children get older, they may have symptoms like coughing and fatigue from the mucus in their lungs, and nausea and stomach pain from the mucus in their pancreas. They'll also get pneumonia and other lung infections more often than normal. So, you may now be asking, how do you know if your child has cystic fibrosis?Doctors diagnose cystic fibrosis using a blood test that looks for the CF gene. There is also a sweat test, which looks for saltier-than-normal sweat, another symptom of cystic fibrosis. Doctors may use other tests, such as a chest x-ray or upper GI series, to check for lung and bowel problems caused by CF. It's a good idea to get treated at a center that specializes in cystic fibrosis because they're up on all the latest therapies. For lung problems, treatments include inhaled medicines to open the airways, medicine to thin mucus and make it easier to cough up, and antibiotics to prevent lung infections. Some people may eventually need a lung transplant. For bowel problems, you'll need to eat a special diet that's higher in protein and calories to make up for the nutrients you're losing. You may also take vitamin supplements. The outlook for people with cystic fibrosis is better today than ever before. Thanks to new treatments, people with this disease can live well into adulthood. They can go to school, play sports, and get a job like everyone else. But because the symptoms of cystic fibrosis are so serious, it's very important to stay on top of treatment, and to call the doctor right away if symptoms get worse. Anyone with a family history of the disease may want to get screened for the CF gene before they decide to have children.

  • Postural drainage

    Postural drainage

    There are 6 to 12 positions a person with pulmonary disease may take to drain mucus from a certain part of the lungs. Another person may tap in certain areas to help loosen the mucus and allow it to be coughed out. Other ways to relieve the lung congestion of cystic fibrosis or bronchiectasis include percussion vests and inhaled aerosols.

    Postural drainage

    illustration

  • Cystic fibrosis

    Cystic fibrosis

    Cystic fibrosis is the most common cause of chronic lung disease in children and young adults, and the most common fatal hereditary disorder affecting white people in the United States.

    Cystic fibrosis

    illustration

  • Primary pulmonary hypertension

    Primary pulmonary hypertension

    Pulmonary hypertension is the narrowing of the pulmonary arterioles within the lung. The narrowing of the arteries creates resistance and an increased work load for the heart. The heart becomes enlarged from pumping blood against the resistance. Some symptoms include chest pain, weakness, shortness of breath, and fatigue. The goal of treatment is control of the symptoms, although the disease usually develops into congestive heart failure.

    Primary pulmonary hypertension

    illustration

  • Totally anomalous pulmonary venous return - x-ray

    Totally anomalous pulmonary venous return - x-ray

    Totally anomalous pulmonary venous return (TAPVR) is a form of congenital heart disease. This x-ray shows an enlarged heart, a large liver, and increased size of the lung blood vessels (pulmonary vascularity).

    Totally anomalous pulmonary venous return - x-ray

    illustration

  • Totally anomalous pulmonary venous return - X-ray

    Totally anomalous pulmonary venous return - X-ray

    Totally anomalous pulmonary venous return (TAPVR) is a form of congenital heart disease. This x-ray shows an enlarged heart, a large liver, and increased pulmonary vascularity.

    Totally anomalous pulmonary venous return - X-ray

    illustration

  • Pulmonary arteries

    Pulmonary arteries

    The pulmonary arteries take blood from the heart to the lungs.

    Pulmonary arteries

    illustration

  • COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder)

    COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder)

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) refers to chronic lung disorders that result in blocked air flow in the lungs. The two main COPD disorders are emphysema and chronic bronchitis, the most common causes of respiratory failure. Emphysema occurs when the walls between the lung's air sacs become weakened and collapse. Damage from COPD is usually permanent and irreversible.

    COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder)

    illustration

  • Pulmonary aspergillosis

    Pulmonary aspergillosis

    Aspergillosis is an acute pulmonary infection caused by the aspergillus fungus. Aspergillus can cause illness three ways: an allergic reaction in asthmatics; a colonization in scarred lung tissue; and an invasive infection with pneumonia which can affect the heart, lungs, brain and kidneys.

    Pulmonary aspergillosis

    illustration

  • Smoking and COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder)

    Smoking and COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder)

    Cigarettes contain many hazardous substances that damage the lung when inhaled, including tar, nicotine, carbon monoxide, and cyanide. Long-term exposure to secondhand tobacco smoke and/or repeated respiratory infections also can increase a person's risk for chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder.

    Smoking and COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder)

    illustration

  • Totally anomalous pulmonary venous return - X-ray

    Totally anomalous pulmonary venous return - X-ray

    Totally anomalous pulmonary venous return (TAPVR) is a form of congenital heart disease.

    Totally anomalous pulmonary venous return - X-ray

    illustration

  • Complete blood count - series

    Complete blood count - series

    Presentation

  • Lung transplant - series

    Lung transplant - series

    Presentation

  • Heart-lung transplant  - series

    Heart-lung transplant - series

    Presentation

  • Complete blood count - series

    Complete blood count - series

    Presentation

Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

Idiopathic diffuse interstitial pulmonary fibrosis; IPF; Pulmonary fibrosis; Cryptogenic fibrosing alveolitis; CFA; Fibrosing alveolitis; Usual interstitial pneumonitis; UIP

Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is scarring or thickening of the lungs without a known cause.

Read Full Article

 
Did you mean:

Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

Idiopathic diffuse interstitial pulmonary fibrosis; IPF; Pulmonary fibrosis; Cryptogenic fibrosing alveolitis; CFA; Fibrosing alveolitis; Usual interstitial pneumonitis; UIP

Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is scarring or thickening of the lungs without a known cause.

Read Full Article

 

Review Date: 1/1/2020

Reviewed By: Denis Hadjiliadis, MD, MHS, Paul F. Harron, Jr. Associate Professor of Medicine, Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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