Health Encyclopedia

Polycystic ovary syndrome

Polycystic ovaries; Polycystic ovary disease; Stein-Leventhal syndrome; Polyfollicular ovarian disease; PCOS

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a condition in which a woman has increased levels of male hormones (androgens). Many problems occur as a result of this increase of hormones, including:Menstrual irregularitiesInfertilitySkin problems such as acne and increased hair growthIncreased number of small cysts in the ovaries

Read Full Article

 
  • Asperger syndrome - Animation

    Asperger syndrome

    Animation

  • Asperger syndrome - Animation

    You sense something is different about your child. He appears to have a tough time fitting in with other children. Maybe your child repeats behaviors, like being obsessed about something, again and again and again. Let's talk about what causes Asperger syndrome. Asperger syndrome is often considered a high functioning form of autism. It is more common in boys than girls, but the cause is unknown. More than likely your child's brain just works differently than other children's brains. How do you know for sure that your child has Asperger syndrome?People with Asperger syndrome become obsessed with a single object or topic. They want to know everything about this topic, and may talk about little else. A child with Asperger syndrome will not withdraw from the world like someone with classic autism does. But they may have problems in social situations that lead to isolation. Common symptoms of people with Asperger syndrome may seem like their body language may be off; They may speak in a monotone voice; They may not respond to other people's comments or emotions. They may not understand humor or a figure of speech. They may speak too loudly in social settings. They may have problems with eye contact, facial expressions, or body language. They may have a hard time forming relationships with other people. Problems are usually obvious by the age of 3, but children are often not diagnosed with Asperger syndrome until they are 7 years old. Your child's doctor will look for a group of behaviors. Does your child have abnormal eye contact? Does he fail to turn when called by name? Does he fail to interact with others?So, how do we treat Asperger syndrome?The symptoms of Asperger syndrome can't be cured, but most children improve with behavior management and social skills training. Talk therapy can help your child manage their emotions, repetitive behaviors, and obsessions. Your child may need physical or occupational therapy, to help with motor skills and sensory problems. Speech therapy can help your child learn the skill of everyday conversation. Parents can learn how to help their child grow into well-adjusted adults. With treatment, many children and their families can learn to cope with Asperger syndrome. Your child may always have problems with social interaction and personal relationships, but many children with Asperger syndrome grow up to have good jobs and lead independent lives.

  • Marfan syndrome

    Marfan syndrome

    Marfan syndrome is a disorder of connective tissue which causes skeletal defects typically recognized in a tall, lanky person. A person with Marfan syndrome may exhibit long limbs and spider-like fingers, chest abnormalities, curvature of the spine and a particular set of facial features including a highly arched palate, and crowded teeth. The most significant of the defects in the syndrome are cardiovascular abnormalities, which may include enlargement (dilatation) of the base of the aorta. Since Marfan syndrome is usually an inherited disorder, prospective parents with a family history of Marfan syndrome should get genetic counseling.

    Marfan syndrome

    illustration

  • Overproductive ovaries

    Overproductive ovaries

    If the ovaries produce too much androgen (hormones such as testosterone), a woman may develop male characteristics. This ovarian imbalance can be caused by tumors in the ovaries or adrenal glands, or by polycystic ovarian syndrome. Hyperandrogenism may include growth of excess body and facial hair, acne, amenorrhea (loss of menstrual periods), and changes in body shape. Virilization can occur with ovarian and adrenal tumors and includes deepening of the voice, male pattern balding, and increased muscle mass.

    Overproductive ovaries

    illustration

  • Basal cell nevus syndrome - close-up of palm

    Basal cell nevus syndrome - close-up of palm

    Basal cell nevus syndrome is an inherited disorder characterized by wide-set eyes, saddle nose, frontal bossing (prominent forehead), prognathism (prominent chin), numerous basal cell carcinomas, and skeletal abnormalities. Skin manifestations include pits in the palms and soles, and numerous basal cell carcinomas. This picture is a close-up of the pits found in the palm of an individual with basal cell nevus syndrome.

    Basal cell nevus syndrome - close-up of palm

    illustration

  • Basal cell nevus syndrome - plantar pits

    Basal cell nevus syndrome - plantar pits

    Basal cell nevus syndrome is an inherited disorder characterized by wide-set eyes, saddle nose, frontal bossing (prominent forehead), prognathism (prominent chin), and skeletal abnormalities. Skin manifestations include pits in the palms and soles, and numerous basal cell carcinomas (skin cancers). This picture is a close-up of the pits found on the sole of the foot of an individual with basal cell nevus syndrome.

    Basal cell nevus syndrome - plantar pits

    illustration

  • CREST syndrome

    CREST syndrome

    The symptoms involved in CREST syndrome are associated with the generalized form of the disease Systemic sclerosis (scleroderma). CREST is an acronym for the clinical features that are seen in a patient with this disease. The "C" stands for calcinosis, where calcium deposits form under the skin on the fingers or other areas of the body. The "R", stands for Raynaud's phenomenon, spasm of blood vessels in the fingers or toes in response to cold or stress. The "E" represents esophageal dysmotility, which can cause difficulty in swallowing. The "S" is for sclerodactyly, tightening of the skin causing the fingers to bend. Finally, the letter "T" is for telangiectasia, dilated vessels on the skin of the fingers, face, or inside of the mouth. Usually only 2 of the 5 symptoms of the CREST syndrome is necessary to be diagnosed with the disease.

    CREST syndrome

    illustration

  • Sturge-Weber syndrome - legs

    Sturge-Weber syndrome - legs

    Sturge-Weber syndrome is a disease that affects the skin and nervous system (neurocutaneous) and is associated with Port Wine Stain, red vascular markings on the face and other parts of the body (shown here on the legs). This is an unusual case, due to the large size of the lesion (extensive involvement). Occasionally seizures or learning disorders are also associated with Sturge-Weber syndrome.

    Sturge-Weber syndrome - legs

    illustration

  • Yellow nail syndrome

    Yellow nail syndrome

    Yellow nail syndrome is characterized by yellow nails that lack a cuticle, grow slowly, and are loose or detached (onycholysis). Yellow nail syndrome is most commonly associated with lung disorders, and with lymphedema.

    Yellow nail syndrome

    illustration

  • Basal cell nevus syndrome

    Basal cell nevus syndrome

    Basal cell nevus syndrome is an inherited disorder which inclines the patient to development of multiple basal cell carcinomas, most prevalent for unknown reasons around the eyes and nose. Here they appear as slightly larger than pinpoint papules on the eye lid.

    Basal cell nevus syndrome

    illustration

  • Basal cell nevus syndrome - face

    Basal cell nevus syndrome - face

    The basal cell nevus syndrome has associated with it odontogenic cysts of the jaws, pitted depressions of the hands and feet (tiny basal cells), and osseous anomalies of the skeleton. Care is given by removal of the carcinomata on a regular basis and genetic counseling, since this is an autosomal dominantly inherited disorder.

    Basal cell nevus syndrome - face

    illustration

  • Basal cell nevus syndrome - face and hand

    Basal cell nevus syndrome - face and hand

    Basal cell nevus syndrome is an inherited disorder characterized by wide-set eyes, saddle nose, frontal bossing (prominent forehead), prognathism (prominent chin), numerous basal cell carcinomas (a type of skin cancer), and skeletal abnormalities. This individual has multiple flesh-colored, dome-shaped bumps on the face which are basal cell cancers, and palmar pits.

    Basal cell nevus syndrome - face and hand

    illustration

  • Asperger syndrome - Animation

    Asperger syndrome

    Animation

  • Asperger syndrome - Animation

    You sense something is different about your child. He appears to have a tough time fitting in with other children. Maybe your child repeats behaviors, like being obsessed about something, again and again and again. Let's talk about what causes Asperger syndrome. Asperger syndrome is often considered a high functioning form of autism. It is more common in boys than girls, but the cause is unknown. More than likely your child's brain just works differently than other children's brains. How do you know for sure that your child has Asperger syndrome?People with Asperger syndrome become obsessed with a single object or topic. They want to know everything about this topic, and may talk about little else. A child with Asperger syndrome will not withdraw from the world like someone with classic autism does. But they may have problems in social situations that lead to isolation. Common symptoms of people with Asperger syndrome may seem like their body language may be off; They may speak in a monotone voice; They may not respond to other people's comments or emotions. They may not understand humor or a figure of speech. They may speak too loudly in social settings. They may have problems with eye contact, facial expressions, or body language. They may have a hard time forming relationships with other people. Problems are usually obvious by the age of 3, but children are often not diagnosed with Asperger syndrome until they are 7 years old. Your child's doctor will look for a group of behaviors. Does your child have abnormal eye contact? Does he fail to turn when called by name? Does he fail to interact with others?So, how do we treat Asperger syndrome?The symptoms of Asperger syndrome can't be cured, but most children improve with behavior management and social skills training. Talk therapy can help your child manage their emotions, repetitive behaviors, and obsessions. Your child may need physical or occupational therapy, to help with motor skills and sensory problems. Speech therapy can help your child learn the skill of everyday conversation. Parents can learn how to help their child grow into well-adjusted adults. With treatment, many children and their families can learn to cope with Asperger syndrome. Your child may always have problems with social interaction and personal relationships, but many children with Asperger syndrome grow up to have good jobs and lead independent lives.

  • Marfan syndrome

    Marfan syndrome

    Marfan syndrome is a disorder of connective tissue which causes skeletal defects typically recognized in a tall, lanky person. A person with Marfan syndrome may exhibit long limbs and spider-like fingers, chest abnormalities, curvature of the spine and a particular set of facial features including a highly arched palate, and crowded teeth. The most significant of the defects in the syndrome are cardiovascular abnormalities, which may include enlargement (dilatation) of the base of the aorta. Since Marfan syndrome is usually an inherited disorder, prospective parents with a family history of Marfan syndrome should get genetic counseling.

    Marfan syndrome

    illustration

  • Overproductive ovaries

    Overproductive ovaries

    If the ovaries produce too much androgen (hormones such as testosterone), a woman may develop male characteristics. This ovarian imbalance can be caused by tumors in the ovaries or adrenal glands, or by polycystic ovarian syndrome. Hyperandrogenism may include growth of excess body and facial hair, acne, amenorrhea (loss of menstrual periods), and changes in body shape. Virilization can occur with ovarian and adrenal tumors and includes deepening of the voice, male pattern balding, and increased muscle mass.

    Overproductive ovaries

    illustration

  • Basal cell nevus syndrome - close-up of palm

    Basal cell nevus syndrome - close-up of palm

    Basal cell nevus syndrome is an inherited disorder characterized by wide-set eyes, saddle nose, frontal bossing (prominent forehead), prognathism (prominent chin), numerous basal cell carcinomas, and skeletal abnormalities. Skin manifestations include pits in the palms and soles, and numerous basal cell carcinomas. This picture is a close-up of the pits found in the palm of an individual with basal cell nevus syndrome.

    Basal cell nevus syndrome - close-up of palm

    illustration

  • Basal cell nevus syndrome - plantar pits

    Basal cell nevus syndrome - plantar pits

    Basal cell nevus syndrome is an inherited disorder characterized by wide-set eyes, saddle nose, frontal bossing (prominent forehead), prognathism (prominent chin), and skeletal abnormalities. Skin manifestations include pits in the palms and soles, and numerous basal cell carcinomas (skin cancers). This picture is a close-up of the pits found on the sole of the foot of an individual with basal cell nevus syndrome.

    Basal cell nevus syndrome - plantar pits

    illustration

  • CREST syndrome

    CREST syndrome

    The symptoms involved in CREST syndrome are associated with the generalized form of the disease Systemic sclerosis (scleroderma). CREST is an acronym for the clinical features that are seen in a patient with this disease. The "C" stands for calcinosis, where calcium deposits form under the skin on the fingers or other areas of the body. The "R", stands for Raynaud's phenomenon, spasm of blood vessels in the fingers or toes in response to cold or stress. The "E" represents esophageal dysmotility, which can cause difficulty in swallowing. The "S" is for sclerodactyly, tightening of the skin causing the fingers to bend. Finally, the letter "T" is for telangiectasia, dilated vessels on the skin of the fingers, face, or inside of the mouth. Usually only 2 of the 5 symptoms of the CREST syndrome is necessary to be diagnosed with the disease.

    CREST syndrome

    illustration

  • Sturge-Weber syndrome - legs

    Sturge-Weber syndrome - legs

    Sturge-Weber syndrome is a disease that affects the skin and nervous system (neurocutaneous) and is associated with Port Wine Stain, red vascular markings on the face and other parts of the body (shown here on the legs). This is an unusual case, due to the large size of the lesion (extensive involvement). Occasionally seizures or learning disorders are also associated with Sturge-Weber syndrome.

    Sturge-Weber syndrome - legs

    illustration

  • Yellow nail syndrome

    Yellow nail syndrome

    Yellow nail syndrome is characterized by yellow nails that lack a cuticle, grow slowly, and are loose or detached (onycholysis). Yellow nail syndrome is most commonly associated with lung disorders, and with lymphedema.

    Yellow nail syndrome

    illustration

  • Basal cell nevus syndrome

    Basal cell nevus syndrome

    Basal cell nevus syndrome is an inherited disorder which inclines the patient to development of multiple basal cell carcinomas, most prevalent for unknown reasons around the eyes and nose. Here they appear as slightly larger than pinpoint papules on the eye lid.

    Basal cell nevus syndrome

    illustration

  • Basal cell nevus syndrome - face

    Basal cell nevus syndrome - face

    The basal cell nevus syndrome has associated with it odontogenic cysts of the jaws, pitted depressions of the hands and feet (tiny basal cells), and osseous anomalies of the skeleton. Care is given by removal of the carcinomata on a regular basis and genetic counseling, since this is an autosomal dominantly inherited disorder.

    Basal cell nevus syndrome - face

    illustration

  • Basal cell nevus syndrome - face and hand

    Basal cell nevus syndrome - face and hand

    Basal cell nevus syndrome is an inherited disorder characterized by wide-set eyes, saddle nose, frontal bossing (prominent forehead), prognathism (prominent chin), numerous basal cell carcinomas (a type of skin cancer), and skeletal abnormalities. This individual has multiple flesh-colored, dome-shaped bumps on the face which are basal cell cancers, and palmar pits.

    Basal cell nevus syndrome - face and hand

    illustration

Polycystic ovary syndrome

Polycystic ovaries; Polycystic ovary disease; Stein-Leventhal syndrome; Polyfollicular ovarian disease; PCOS

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a condition in which a woman has increased levels of male hormones (androgens). Many problems occur as a result of this increase of hormones, including:Menstrual irregularitiesInfertilitySkin problems such as acne and increased hair growthIncreased number of small cysts in the ovaries

Read Full Article

 
Did you mean:

Polycystic ovary syndrome

Polycystic ovaries; Polycystic ovary disease; Stein-Leventhal syndrome; Polyfollicular ovarian disease; PCOS

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a condition in which a woman has increased levels of male hormones (androgens). Many problems occur as a result of this increase of hormones, including:Menstrual irregularitiesInfertilitySkin problems such as acne and increased hair growthIncreased number of small cysts in the ovaries

Read Full Article

 

Review Date: 1/27/2020

Reviewed By: LaQuita Martinez, MD, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Emory Johns Creek Hospital, Alpharetta, GA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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