Health Encyclopedia

 
  • Cyanotic heart disease

    Cyanotic heart disease

    Cyanotic heart disease is a congenital heart defect which results in low oxygen levels in the blood and causes the child's lips, fingers, and toes to look blue (cyanosis).

    Cyanotic heart disease

    illustration

  • Totally anomalous pulmonary venous return - x-ray

    Totally anomalous pulmonary venous return - x-ray

    Totally anomalous pulmonary venous return (TAPVR) is a form of congenital heart disease. This x-ray shows an enlarged heart, a large liver, and increased size of the lung blood vessels (pulmonary vascularity).

    Totally anomalous pulmonary venous return - x-ray

    illustration

  • Totally anomalous pulmonary venous return - X-ray

    Totally anomalous pulmonary venous return - X-ray

    Totally anomalous pulmonary venous return (TAPVR) is a form of congenital heart disease. This x-ray shows an enlarged heart, a large liver, and increased pulmonary vascularity.

    Totally anomalous pulmonary venous return - X-ray

    illustration

  • Hepatomegaly

    Hepatomegaly

    Hepatomegaly is enlargement of the liver beyond its normal size. Certain conditions such as infection, parasites, tumors, anemias, toxic states, storage diseases, heart failure, congenital heart disease, and metabolic disturbances may all cause an enlarged liver.

    Hepatomegaly

    illustration

  • Cyanosis of the nail bed

    Cyanosis of the nail bed

    Lack of oxygen in the blood causes a bluish discoloration in the skin or mucous membranes called cyanosis. Most cyanosis is seen as a result of congenital heart disease, pulmonary disease, or as a terminal event as in cardiopulmonary arrest.

    Cyanosis of the nail bed

    illustration

  • Heart-lung transplant  - series

    Heart-lung transplant - series

    Presentation

  • Heart transplant  - series

    Heart transplant - series

    Presentation

  • Complete blood count - series

    Complete blood count - series

    Presentation

    • Cyanotic heart disease

      Cyanotic heart disease

      Cyanotic heart disease is a congenital heart defect which results in low oxygen levels in the blood and causes the child's lips, fingers, and toes to look blue (cyanosis).

      Cyanotic heart disease

      illustration

    • Totally anomalous pulmonary venous return - x-ray

      Totally anomalous pulmonary venous return - x-ray

      Totally anomalous pulmonary venous return (TAPVR) is a form of congenital heart disease. This x-ray shows an enlarged heart, a large liver, and increased size of the lung blood vessels (pulmonary vascularity).

      Totally anomalous pulmonary venous return - x-ray

      illustration

    • Totally anomalous pulmonary venous return - X-ray

      Totally anomalous pulmonary venous return - X-ray

      Totally anomalous pulmonary venous return (TAPVR) is a form of congenital heart disease. This x-ray shows an enlarged heart, a large liver, and increased pulmonary vascularity.

      Totally anomalous pulmonary venous return - X-ray

      illustration

    • Hepatomegaly

      Hepatomegaly

      Hepatomegaly is enlargement of the liver beyond its normal size. Certain conditions such as infection, parasites, tumors, anemias, toxic states, storage diseases, heart failure, congenital heart disease, and metabolic disturbances may all cause an enlarged liver.

      Hepatomegaly

      illustration

    • Cyanosis of the nail bed

      Cyanosis of the nail bed

      Lack of oxygen in the blood causes a bluish discoloration in the skin or mucous membranes called cyanosis. Most cyanosis is seen as a result of congenital heart disease, pulmonary disease, or as a terminal event as in cardiopulmonary arrest.

      Cyanosis of the nail bed

      illustration

    • Heart-lung transplant  - series

      Heart-lung transplant - series

      Presentation

    • Heart transplant  - series

      Heart transplant - series

      Presentation

    • Complete blood count - series

      Complete blood count - series

      Presentation

    Review Date: 10/22/2019

    Reviewed By: Michael A. Chen, MD, PhD, Associate Professor of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Harborview Medical Center, University of Washington Medical School, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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