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Pulse - bounding

Bounding pulse

A bounding pulse is a strong throbbing felt over one of the arteries in the body. It is due to a forceful heartbeat.

Causes

A bounding pulse and rapid heart rate both occur in the following conditions or events:

  • Abnormal or rapid heart rhythms
  • Anemia
  • Anxiety
  • Long-term (chronic) kidney disease
  • Heart failure
  • Heart valve problem called aortic regurgitation
  • Heavy exercise
  • Fever
  • Pregnancy, because of increased fluid and blood in the body
  • Overactive thyroid (hyperthyroidism)

When to Contact a Medical Professional

Call your health care provider if the intensity or rate of your pulse increases suddenly and does not go away. This is very important when:

  • You have other symptoms along with increased pulse.
  • The change in your pulse does not go away when you rest for a few minutes.
  • You already have been diagnosed with a heart problem.

For more information on testing, diagnostic, surgical and treatment services available at Huron Regional Medical Center, click here. The medical staff at HRMC includes full-time primary and specialty physicians to care for your whole family, as well as visiting specialists who see patients in HRMC'S Specialty Clinic, HRMC Physicians Clinic and other local clinics. Learn more by visiting our online Find-a-Doc directory.

What to Expect at Your Office Visit

Your provider will do a physical exam that includes checking your temperature, pulse, rate of breathing, and blood pressure. Your heart and circulation will also be checked.

Your provider will ask questions such as:

  • Is this the first time you have felt a bounding pulse?
  • Did it develop suddenly or gradually? Is it always present, or does it come and go?
  • Does it only happen along with other symptoms, such as palpitations? What other symptoms do you have?
  • Does it get better if you rest?
  • Are you pregnant?
  • Have you had a fever?
  • Have you been very anxious or stressed?
  • Do you have other heart problems, such as heart valve disease, high blood pressure, or congestive heart failure?
  • Do you have kidney failure?

The following diagnostic tests may be performed:

References

Fang JC, O'Gara PT. The history and physical examination: an evidence-based approach. In: Zipes DP, Libby P, Bonow RO, Mann DL, Braunwald E, eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine. 11th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2019:chap 10.

Goldman L. Approach to the patient with possible cardiovascular disease. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil Medicine. 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 51.

  • Taking your carotid pulse

    Taking your carotid pulse - illustration

    The carotid arteries take oxygenated blood from the heart to the brain. The pulse from the carotids may be felt on either side of thefront of the neck just below the angle of the jaw. This rhythmic beat is caused by varying volumes of blood being pushed out of the heart toward the extremities.

    Taking your carotid pulse

    illustration

    • Taking your carotid pulse

      Taking your carotid pulse - illustration

      The carotid arteries take oxygenated blood from the heart to the brain. The pulse from the carotids may be felt on either side of thefront of the neck just below the angle of the jaw. This rhythmic beat is caused by varying volumes of blood being pushed out of the heart toward the extremities.

      Taking your carotid pulse

      illustration

    Tests for Pulse - bounding

     

     

    Review Date: 5/12/2018

    Reviewed By: Laura J. Martin, MD, MPH, ABIM Board Certified in Internal Medicine and Hospice and Palliative Medicine, Atlanta, GA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

    The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- A.D.A.M., a business unit of Ebix, Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.
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