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Asthma

Bronchial asthma; Wheezing - asthma - adults

Asthma is a chronic disease that causes the airways of the lungs to swell and narrow. It leads to breathing difficulty such as wheezing, shortness of breath, chest tightness, and coughing.

Causes

Asthma is caused by swelling (inflammation) in the airways. When an asthma attack occurs, the lining of the air passages swells and the muscles surrounding the airways become tight. This reduces the amount of air that can pass through the airway.

Asthma symptoms can be caused by breathing in substances called allergens or triggers, or by other causes.

Common asthma triggers include:

  • Animals (pet hair or dander)
  • Dust mites
  • Certain medicines (aspirin and other NSAIDS)
  • Changes in weather (most often cold weather)
  • Chemicals in the air or in food
  • Physical activity
  • Mold
  • Pollen
  • Respiratory infections, such as the common cold
  • Strong emotions (stress)
  • Tobacco smoke

Substances in some workplaces can also trigger asthma symptoms, leading to occupational asthma. The most common triggers are wood dust, grain dust, animal dander, fungi, or chemicals.

Many people with asthma have a personal or family history of allergies, such as hay fever (allergic rhinitis) or eczema. Others have no history of allergies.

Asthma Treatment Quiz

  • Which of the following is not a goal of asthma treatment?

     

    A. To cure asthma

     

    B. To control airway swelling

     

    C. To learn about your asthma triggers so you can avoid them

    Correct Answer
    The correct answer is to cure asthma. Unfortunately, there's no way to cure asthma. However, by working closely with your doctor, you can learn to manage it.
  • The main types of medicine for asthma are:

     

    A. Medicines that work fast (quick-relief drugs) to ease asthma symptoms

     

    B. Medicines that work over time (control drugs) to prevent asthma attacks

     

    C. Both A and B

    Correct Answer
    The correct answer is both A and B. The goals of asthma treatment are controlling airway swelling and avoiding what triggers your symptoms.
  • This device, used with an inhaler, helps get more medicine into the airways.

     

    A. Spacer

     

    B. Cap

     

    C. Mouthpiece

     

    D. Canister

    Correct Answer
    The correct answer is spacer. The spacer connects to the mouthpiece. The inhaled medicine goes into the spacer tube first. Then you take two deep breaths to get the medicine into your lungs. Using a spacer wastes less medicine than spraying the medicine into your mouth.
  • Sometimes younger children use a nebulizer to take their medicine. What does this machine do?

     

    A. It turns asthma medicine into liquid children can drink

     

    B. It turns asthma medicine into a mist children can breathe in

    Correct Answer
    The correct answer is it turns asthma medicine into a mist children can breathe in. This device makes it easy and pleasant to breathe in the medicine. Small children may need to use a mask to help them inhale all the mist. Talk with your doctor if you have questions about your child's treatment.
  • You can stop taking your control medicine when you start to feel better.

     

    A. True

     

    B. False

    Correct Answer
    The correct answer is false. Control drugs must be taken every day to be effective. Take your medicine even when you feel OK. You may need to take these medicines for at least a month before you start to feel better. Your doctor will work with you to find asthma medicines that are right for you.
  • Why should you use a peak flow meter to check how quickly you can move air out of your lungs?

     

    A. It can tell you if an asthma attack is coming, sometimes before you have symptoms

     

    B. It is one of the best ways to control your asthma

     

    C. It can help you keep your asthma from getting worse

     

    D. All of the above

    Correct Answer
    The correct answer is all of the above. Peak flow measurements can help show when you need medicine or other action to treat your asthma. Peak flow values of 50 - 80% of your best results signal a moderate asthma attack, while values below 50% mean a severe attack.
  • If you use quick-relief drugs twice a week or more to control your asthma symptoms, you should:

     

    A. Do nothing

     

    B. Tell your doctor

     

    C. Cut back to once a week

    Correct Answer
    The correct answer is tell your doctor. If you need to use quick-relief drugs more than twice a week your asthma may not be under control. Your doctor may need to change your dose of daily control drugs.
  • Getting rid of tobacco smoke at home is the most important thing a family can do to help a child with asthma.

     

    A. True

     

    B. False

    Correct Answer
    The correct answer is true. Don't smoke inside or outside the home. Family members and visitors who smoke outside can carry the smoke inside on their clothes and hair. Helping children avoid asthma triggers is the first step toward helping them feel better.
  • Exercise can bring on asthma symptoms in some people, but you can still participate in the activities you love. Do this ahead of time:

     

    A. Use your quick-relief drugs just before exercising

     

    B. Drink a glass of water

     

    C. Wear a scarf over your mouth

    Correct Answer
    The correct answer is use your quick-relief drugs just before exercising. Swimming is a good sport for people with exercise-induced asthma. The warm, moist air helps keep asthma symptoms away. Football, baseball, and other sports with breaks in the action are less likely to trigger asthma symptoms.
  • Asthma action plans should include:

     

    A. A plan for taking asthma medicines when your condition is stable

     

    B. A list of asthma triggers and how to avoid them

     

    C. How to tell when your asthma gets worse, and when to call your doctor or nurse

     

    D. All of the above

    Correct Answer
    The correct answer is all of the above. An asthma action plan is an important part of treatment for anyone with asthma. If you don't already have one, talk with your doctor about creating a personal asthma action plan.
  • Which of these asthma symptoms is an emergency?

     

    A. Bluish lips and face

     

    B. Severe drowsiness or confusion during an asthma attack

     

    C. Extreme difficulty breathing

     

    D. Rapid pulse

     

    E. Severe anxiety caused by shortness of breath

     

    F. All of the above

    Correct Answer
    The correct answer is all of the above. Asthma attacks can be dangerous if a person's airways become severely blocked. If you notice any of these symptoms, call 9-1-1. This might include oxygen, breathing assistance, and medicines given through a vein (IV).
  • People with asthma can lead normal, active lives.

     

    A. True

     

    B. False

    Correct Answer
    The correct answer is true. Asthma can be scary, but it doesn't have to control you. By getting the right medical treatment, working closely with your doctor, and avoiding your asthma triggers, you can manage your condition and enjoy a full life.

Symptoms

Asthma symptoms vary from person to person. For example, you may have symptoms all the time or mostly during physical activity.

Most people with asthma have attacks separated by symptom-free periods. Some people have long-term shortness of breath with episodes of increased shortness of breath. Wheezing or a cough may be the main symptom.

Asthma attacks can last for minutes to days. An asthma attack may start suddenly or develop slowly over several hours or days. It may become dangerous if airflow is severely blocked.

Symptoms of asthma include:

  • Cough with or without sputum (phlegm) production
  • Pulling in of the skin between the ribs when breathing (intercostal retractions)
  • Shortness of breath that gets worse with exercise or activity
  • Whistling sound or wheezing as you breathe
  • Pain or tightness in the chest
  • Difficulty sleeping
  • Abnormal breathing pattern (breathing out takes more than twice as long as breathing in)

Emergency symptoms that need prompt medical help include:

  • Bluish color to the lips and face
  • Decreased level of alertness, such as severe drowsiness or confusion, during an asthma attack
  • Extreme difficulty breathing
  • Rapid pulse
  • Severe anxiety due to shortness of breath
  • Sweating
  • Difficulty speaking
  • Breathing temporarily stops

Exams and Tests

The health care provider will use a stethoscope to listen to your lungs. Wheezing or other asthma-related sounds may be heard. The provider will take your medical history and ask about your symptoms.

Tests that may be ordered include:

Treatment

The goals of treatment are:

You and your provider should work as a team to manage your asthma symptoms. Follow your provider's instructions on taking medicines, eliminating asthma triggers, and monitoring symptoms.

MEDICINES FOR ASTHMA

There are two kinds of medicines for treating asthma:

  • Control medicines to help prevent attacks
  • Quick-relief (rescue) medicines for use during attacks

LONG-TERM MEDICINES

These are also called maintenance or control medicines. They are used to prevent symptoms in people with moderate to severe asthma. You must take them every day for them to work. Take them even when you feel OK.

Some long-term medicines are breathed in (inhaled), such as steroids and long-acting beta-agonists. Others are taken by mouth (orally). Your provider will prescribe the right medicine for you.

QUICK-RELIEF MEDICINES

These are also called rescue medicines. They are taken:

  • For coughing, wheezing, trouble breathing, or during an asthma attack
  • Just before physical activity to help prevent asthma symptoms

Tell your provider if you are using quick-relief medicines twice a week or more. If so, your asthma may not be under control. Your provider may change the dose or your daily asthma control medicine.

Quick-relief medicines include:

  • Short-acting inhaled bronchodilators
  • Oral corticosteroids for a severe asthma attack

A severe asthma attack requires a checkup by a doctor. You may also need a hospital stay. There, you will likely be given oxygen, breathing assistance, and medicines given through a vein (IV).

ASTHMA CARE AT HOME

You can take steps to decrease the possibility of asthma attacks: 

Asthma action plans are written documents for managing asthma. An asthma action plan should include:

  • Instructions for taking asthma medicines when your condition is stable
  • A list of asthma triggers and how to avoid them
  • How to recognize when your asthma is getting worse, and when to call your provider

A peak flow meter is a simple device to measure how quickly you can move air out of your lungs.

  • It can help you see if an attack is coming, sometimes even before symptoms appear. Peak flow measurements help let you know when you need to take medicine or other action.
  • Peak flow values of 50% to 80% of your best results are a sign of a moderate asthma attack. Numbers below 50% are a sign of a severe attack.

Outlook (Prognosis)

There is no cure for asthma, although symptoms sometimes improve over time. With proper self-care and medical treatment, most people with asthma can lead a normal life.

Possible Complications

The complications of asthma can be severe, and may include:

  • Death
  • Decreased ability to exercise and take part in other activities
  • Lack of sleep due to nighttime symptoms
  • Permanent changes in the function of the lungs
  • Persistent cough
  • Trouble breathing that requires breathing assistance (ventilator)

When to Contact a Medical Professional

Contact your provider for an appointment if asthma symptoms develop.

Contact your provider right away if:

  • An asthma attack requires more medicine than recommended
  • Symptoms get worse or do not improve with treatment
  • You have shortness of breath while talking
  • Your peak flow measurement is 50% to 80% of your personal best

Go to the emergency room right away if these symptoms occur:

  • Drowsiness or confusion
  • Severe shortness of breath at rest
  • A peak flow measurement of less than 50% of your personal best
  • Severe chest pain
  • Bluish color to the lips and face
  • Extreme difficulty breathing
  • Rapid pulse
  • Severe anxiety due to shortness of breath

Prevention

You can reduce asthma symptoms by avoiding triggers and substances that irritate the airways.

  • Cover bedding with allergy-proof casings to reduce exposure to dust mites.
  • Remove carpets from bedrooms and vacuum regularly.
  • Use only unscented detergents and cleaning materials in the home.
  • Keep humidity levels low and fix leaks to reduce the growth of organisms such as mold.
  • Keep the house clean and keep food in containers and out of bedrooms. This helps reduce the possibility of cockroaches. Body parts and droppings from cockroaches can trigger asthma attacks in some people.
  • If someone is allergic to an animal that cannot be removed from the home, the animal should be kept out of the bedroom. Place filtering material over the heating/air conditioning outlets in your home to trap animal dander. Change the filter in furnaces and air conditioners often.
  • Eliminate tobacco smoke from the home. This is the single most important thing a family can do to help someone with asthma. Smoking outside the house is not enough. Family members and visitors who smoke outside carry smoke residue inside on their clothes and hair. This can trigger asthma symptoms. If you smoke, now is a good time to quit.
  • Avoid air pollution, industrial dust, and irritating fumes as much as possible.

References

Boulet L-P, Godbout K. Diagnosis of asthma in adults. In: Burks AW, Holgate ST, O'Hehir RE, et al, eds. Middleton's Allergy: Principles and Practice. 9th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2020:chap 51.

Brozek JL, Bousquet J, Agache I, et al. Allergic rhinitis and its impact on asthma (ARIA) guidelines-2016 revision. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2017;140(4):950-958. PMID: 28602936 www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28602936.

Liu AH, Spahn JD, Sicherer SH. Childhood asthma. In: Kliegman RM, St. Geme JW, Blum NJ, Shah SS, Tasker RC, Wilson KM, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics. 21st ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2020:chap 169.

Marcdante KJ, Kliegman RM. Asthma. In: Marcdante KJ, Kliegman RM, eds. Nelson Essentials of Pediatrics. 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2019:chap 78.

Nowak RM, Tokarski GF. Asthma. In: Walls RM, Hockberger RS, Gausche-Hill M, eds. Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice. 9th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2018:chap 63.

  • What causes wheezing?

    Animation

  •  

    What causes wheezing? - Animation

    Wheezing can be a normal healthy response to an unhealthy environment. Or, wheezing can be a sign of asthma. I'm Dr. Alan Greene and I want to talk with you for a moment about how to tell the difference, what causes wheezing anyway, and when is it healthy and when is it not. Well to understand that, first let's all take a deep breath together (inhales). When you breathe in, the air comes through your nose or mouth, through the big windpipe and breaks into 2 big bronchi, one into each lung. And from there they break into a whole bunch of little, smaller bronchioles. It's almost like a tree's branches branching out. And those bronchioles are where the wheezing happens. Let's look at a bronchiole. Here's one of those small airways. Now if you happen to walk into a cloud of something that's toxic, your body is going to respond instantly to try to protect you. The first thing that will happen is the muscles around the bronchioles will tighten, will constrict down almost like a boa constrictor, and you get the tight airways. If that toxic cloud is still there, to protect your delicate tissues deep in your lungs, swelling of the lining will happen. Inflammatory stuff to help protect you from those toxins. And if it's still there, still irritating, mucus will begin to be secreted to be able again to capture and protect you from those toxins. That's wheezing. Asthma happens when your airways are hyper-responsive. When they're twitchy. When they're hyper-alert and they respond to something that's not truly dangerous. The problem with that is when your bronchioles are constricted and swollen and has mucus in them, that narrow little opening is hard to breathe through. You have to work to breathe, especially to breath out. And that hard breathing through a narrow passageway is what creates the sound we know as wheezing.

  • Asthma

    Animation

  •  

    Asthma - Animation

    Breathing is something we do without even thinking about it. But some people have a hard time breathing easily. They wheeze, cough, and just can't get enough air into their lungs. Let's talk about asthma. Normally when you breathe, oxygen-rich air enters your nose and mouth and travels to the airways in your lungs. But when you have an asthma attack, the muscles in your airways tighten. Your airways swell up and get narrower. It's like pressing on a straw when you're trying to drink through it. The more you press, the less of your drink can squeeze up through the straw. In the same way, less air can squeeze through tight airways into your lungs. So, what causes asthma? People with asthma have different triggers. Some people are sensitive to pet hair or dander. Others find that dust, pollen, smoke, or chemicals make them wheeze. You may have trouble breathing when you're under stress or working out at the gym. Often people with asthma have allergies that trigger their attacks. Others have a parent or other relative who has allergies. You may ask, how can you know for sure that you have asthma? During an asthma attack, you'll have trouble breathing. You may cough or wheeze as you try to draw air into your lungs. If you're having a severe attack, your lips and face may turn blue and you'll have a hard time getting any air. That's when it's time to call for emergency help. Your doctor will listen to your lungs with a stethoscope, and may do other tests to check your blood and lung function. To find out what's triggering your asthma, you may need to be tested for allergies to mold, pollen, pet dander, or other substances. To measure the strength of air flowing out of your lungs, you'll blow into a device called a peak flow meter. You can also use a peak flow meter to make sure you're keeping your asthma under control. Different medicines are used to prevent and treat asthma. Control drugs help you avoid asthma attacks, but you need to take them every day for them to work. You breathe in control drugs like Flovent, Singulair, and Pulmicort through an inhaler. If you're having an asthma attack, you can take a quick-relief drug to control your wheezing. Examples of quick-relief drugs include short-acting inhaled drugs and steroid medicines that you take by mouth. When you have asthma, you need to be prepared. Know your asthma triggers and try to avoid them. Carry an inhaler with you in case you have an asthma attack. If you ever have an attack that's so severe you can't breathe, call 911 or get emergency medical help.

  • Lungs

    Lungs - illustration

    The major features of the lungs include the bronchi, the bronchioles and the alveoli. The alveoli are the microscopic blood vessel-lined sacks in which oxygen and carbon dioxide gas are exchanged.

    Lungs

    illustration

  • Spirometry

    Spirometry - illustration

    Spirometry is a painless study of air volume and flow rate within the lungs. Spirometry is frequently used to evaluate lung function in people with obstructive or restrictive lung diseases such as asthma or cystic fibrosis.

    Spirometry

    illustration

  • Asthma

    Asthma - illustration

    Asthma is a disease in which inflammation of the airways causes airflow into and out of the lungs to be restricted. The muscles of the bronchial tree become tight and the lining of the air passages swells, reducing airflow and producing the characteristic wheezing sound. This is known as an asthma attack, which can occur as an allergic reaction to an allergen or other substance (acute asthma), or as a part of a complex disease cycle which may include reaction to stress or exercise (chronic asthma).

    Asthma

    illustration

  • Peak flow meter

    Peak flow meter - illustration

    A peak flow meter is commonly used by a person with asthma to measue the amount of air that can be expelled from the lungs. If the airways become narrow or blocked due to asthma, peak flow values will drop because the person cannot blow air out of the lungs as well. A peak flow meter can be a useful aid in monitoring a person's asthma over time and can also be used to help determine how well a patient's medications are working.

    Peak flow meter

    illustration

  • Asthmatic bronchiole and normal bronchiole

    Asthmatic bronchiole and normal bronchiole - illustration

    Asthma is a disease in which inflammation of the airways causes airflow into and out of the lungs to be restricted. When an asthma attack occurs, mucus production is increased, muscles of the bronchial tree become tight, and the lining of the air passages swells, reducing airflow and producing the characteristic wheezing sound.

    Asthmatic bronchiole and normal bronchiole

    illustration

  • Common asthma triggers

    Common asthma triggers - illustration

    Many of the same substances that trigger allergies can also trigger asthma. Common allergens include pollen, dust mites, mold and pet dander. Other asthma triggers include irritants like smoke, pollution, fumes, cleaning chemicals, and sprays. Asthma symptoms can be substantially reduced by avoiding exposure to known allergens and respiratory irritants.

    Common asthma triggers

    illustration

  • Exercise-induced asthma

    Exercise-induced asthma - illustration

    Exercise-induced asthma is distinct from allergic asthma in that it does not produce long-term increase in airway activity. People who only experience asthma when they exercise may be able to control their symptoms with preventive measures such as warm-up and cool-down exercises.

    Exercise-induced asthma

    illustration

  • Respiratory system

    Respiratory system - illustration

    Air is breathed in through the nasal passageways, travels through the trachea and bronchi to the lungs.

    Respiratory system

    illustration

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    Presentation

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  • Nebulizer use - Series - Part one

    Nebulizer use - Series - Part one

    Presentation

  • Peak flow meter use - Series - Part one

    Peak flow meter use - Series - Part one

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  • What causes wheezing?

    Animation

  •  

    What causes wheezing? - Animation

    Wheezing can be a normal healthy response to an unhealthy environment. Or, wheezing can be a sign of asthma. I'm Dr. Alan Greene and I want to talk with you for a moment about how to tell the difference, what causes wheezing anyway, and when is it healthy and when is it not. Well to understand that, first let's all take a deep breath together (inhales). When you breathe in, the air comes through your nose or mouth, through the big windpipe and breaks into 2 big bronchi, one into each lung. And from there they break into a whole bunch of little, smaller bronchioles. It's almost like a tree's branches branching out. And those bronchioles are where the wheezing happens. Let's look at a bronchiole. Here's one of those small airways. Now if you happen to walk into a cloud of something that's toxic, your body is going to respond instantly to try to protect you. The first thing that will happen is the muscles around the bronchioles will tighten, will constrict down almost like a boa constrictor, and you get the tight airways. If that toxic cloud is still there, to protect your delicate tissues deep in your lungs, swelling of the lining will happen. Inflammatory stuff to help protect you from those toxins. And if it's still there, still irritating, mucus will begin to be secreted to be able again to capture and protect you from those toxins. That's wheezing. Asthma happens when your airways are hyper-responsive. When they're twitchy. When they're hyper-alert and they respond to something that's not truly dangerous. The problem with that is when your bronchioles are constricted and swollen and has mucus in them, that narrow little opening is hard to breathe through. You have to work to breathe, especially to breath out. And that hard breathing through a narrow passageway is what creates the sound we know as wheezing.

  • Asthma

    Animation

  •  

    Asthma - Animation

    Breathing is something we do without even thinking about it. But some people have a hard time breathing easily. They wheeze, cough, and just can't get enough air into their lungs. Let's talk about asthma. Normally when you breathe, oxygen-rich air enters your nose and mouth and travels to the airways in your lungs. But when you have an asthma attack, the muscles in your airways tighten. Your airways swell up and get narrower. It's like pressing on a straw when you're trying to drink through it. The more you press, the less of your drink can squeeze up through the straw. In the same way, less air can squeeze through tight airways into your lungs. So, what causes asthma? People with asthma have different triggers. Some people are sensitive to pet hair or dander. Others find that dust, pollen, smoke, or chemicals make them wheeze. You may have trouble breathing when you're under stress or working out at the gym. Often people with asthma have allergies that trigger their attacks. Others have a parent or other relative who has allergies. You may ask, how can you know for sure that you have asthma? During an asthma attack, you'll have trouble breathing. You may cough or wheeze as you try to draw air into your lungs. If you're having a severe attack, your lips and face may turn blue and you'll have a hard time getting any air. That's when it's time to call for emergency help. Your doctor will listen to your lungs with a stethoscope, and may do other tests to check your blood and lung function. To find out what's triggering your asthma, you may need to be tested for allergies to mold, pollen, pet dander, or other substances. To measure the strength of air flowing out of your lungs, you'll blow into a device called a peak flow meter. You can also use a peak flow meter to make sure you're keeping your asthma under control. Different medicines are used to prevent and treat asthma. Control drugs help you avoid asthma attacks, but you need to take them every day for them to work. You breathe in control drugs like Flovent, Singulair, and Pulmicort through an inhaler. If you're having an asthma attack, you can take a quick-relief drug to control your wheezing. Examples of quick-relief drugs include short-acting inhaled drugs and steroid medicines that you take by mouth. When you have asthma, you need to be prepared. Know your asthma triggers and try to avoid them. Carry an inhaler with you in case you have an asthma attack. If you ever have an attack that's so severe you can't breathe, call 911 or get emergency medical help.

  • Lungs

    Lungs - illustration

    The major features of the lungs include the bronchi, the bronchioles and the alveoli. The alveoli are the microscopic blood vessel-lined sacks in which oxygen and carbon dioxide gas are exchanged.

    Lungs

    illustration

  • Spirometry

    Spirometry - illustration

    Spirometry is a painless study of air volume and flow rate within the lungs. Spirometry is frequently used to evaluate lung function in people with obstructive or restrictive lung diseases such as asthma or cystic fibrosis.

    Spirometry

    illustration

  • Asthma

    Asthma - illustration

    Asthma is a disease in which inflammation of the airways causes airflow into and out of the lungs to be restricted. The muscles of the bronchial tree become tight and the lining of the air passages swells, reducing airflow and producing the characteristic wheezing sound. This is known as an asthma attack, which can occur as an allergic reaction to an allergen or other substance (acute asthma), or as a part of a complex disease cycle which may include reaction to stress or exercise (chronic asthma).

    Asthma

    illustration

  • Peak flow meter

    Peak flow meter - illustration

    A peak flow meter is commonly used by a person with asthma to measue the amount of air that can be expelled from the lungs. If the airways become narrow or blocked due to asthma, peak flow values will drop because the person cannot blow air out of the lungs as well. A peak flow meter can be a useful aid in monitoring a person's asthma over time and can also be used to help determine how well a patient's medications are working.

    Peak flow meter

    illustration

  • Asthmatic bronchiole and normal bronchiole

    Asthmatic bronchiole and normal bronchiole - illustration

    Asthma is a disease in which inflammation of the airways causes airflow into and out of the lungs to be restricted. When an asthma attack occurs, mucus production is increased, muscles of the bronchial tree become tight, and the lining of the air passages swells, reducing airflow and producing the characteristic wheezing sound.

    Asthmatic bronchiole and normal bronchiole

    illustration

  • Common asthma triggers

    Common asthma triggers - illustration

    Many of the same substances that trigger allergies can also trigger asthma. Common allergens include pollen, dust mites, mold and pet dander. Other asthma triggers include irritants like smoke, pollution, fumes, cleaning chemicals, and sprays. Asthma symptoms can be substantially reduced by avoiding exposure to known allergens and respiratory irritants.

    Common asthma triggers

    illustration

  • Exercise-induced asthma

    Exercise-induced asthma - illustration

    Exercise-induced asthma is distinct from allergic asthma in that it does not produce long-term increase in airway activity. People who only experience asthma when they exercise may be able to control their symptoms with preventive measures such as warm-up and cool-down exercises.

    Exercise-induced asthma

    illustration

  • Respiratory system

    Respiratory system - illustration

    Air is breathed in through the nasal passageways, travels through the trachea and bronchi to the lungs.

    Respiratory system

    illustration

  • Spacer use - Series - Part one

    Presentation

  • Metered dose inhaler use - Series - step one

    Presentation

  • Nebulizer use - Series - Part one

    Presentation

  • Peak flow meter use - Series - Part one

    Presentation

A Closer Look

 

Talking to your MD

 

Self Care

 
 

Review Date: 1/1/2020

Reviewed By: Neil K. Kaneshiro, MD, MHA, Clinical Professor of Pediatrics, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA. Internal review and update on 02/24/2020 by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- A.D.A.M., a business unit of Ebix, Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.
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