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Drug-induced low blood sugar

Hypoglycemia - drug-induced; Low blood glucose - drug-induced

Drug-induced low blood sugar is low blood glucose that results from taking medicine.

Causes

Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) is common in people with diabetes who are taking insulin or other medicines to control their diabetes.

Other than certain medicines, the following can also cause blood sugar (glucose) level to drop:

  • Drinking alcohol
  • Getting more activity than usual
  • Intentionally or unintentionally overdosing on the medicines used to treat diabetes
  • Missing meals

Even when diabetes is managed very carefully, the medicines used to treat diabetes can result in drug-induced low blood sugar. The condition may also occur when someone without diabetes takes a medicine used to treat diabetes. In rare cases, non-diabetes-related medicines can cause low blood sugar.

Medicines that can cause drug-induced low blood sugar include:

  • Beta-blockers (such as atenolol, or propanolol overdose)
  • Cibenzoline and quinidine (heart arrhythmia drugs)
  • Indomethacin (a pain reliever)
  • Insulin
  • Metformin when used with sulfonylureas
  • SGLT2 inhibitors (such as dapagliflozin and empagliflozin) with or without sulfonylureas
  • Sulfonylureas (such as glipizide, glimepiride, glyburide)
  • Thiazolidinediones (such as pioglitazone and rosiglitazone) when used with sulfonylureas
  • Drugs that fight infections (such as gatifloxacin, pentamadine, quinine, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole)

References

Cryer PE. Glycemic goals in diabetes: trade-off between glycemic control and iatrogenic hypoglycemia. Diabetes. 2014;63(7):2188-2195. PMID: 24962915 www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24962915.

Gale EAM, Anderson JV. Diabetes mellitus. In: Kumar P, Clark M, eds. Kumar and Clarke's Clinical Medicine. 9th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2017:chap 27.

  • Food and insulin release

    Food and insulin release - illustration

    Insulin is a hormone secreted by the pancreas in response to increased glucose levels in the blood.

    Food and insulin release

    illustration

    • Food and insulin release

      Food and insulin release - illustration

      Insulin is a hormone secreted by the pancreas in response to increased glucose levels in the blood.

      Food and insulin release

      illustration

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    Review Date: 10/12/2018

    Reviewed By: David C. Dugdale, III, MD, Professor of Medicine, Division of General Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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