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Simple pulmonary eosinophilia

Pulmonary infiltrates with eosinophilia; Loffler syndrome; Eosinophilic pneumonia; Pneumonia - eosinophilic

Simple pulmonary eosinophilia is inflammation of the lungs from an increase in eosinophils, a type of white blood cell. Pulmonary means related to the lungs. 

Causes

Most cases of this condition are due to an allergic reaction from:

In some cases, no cause is found.

Symptoms

Symptoms may include any of the following:

Symptoms can range from none at all to severe. They may go away without treatment.

Exams and Tests

The health care provider will listen to your chest with a stethoscope. Crackle-like sounds, called rales, may be heard. Rales suggest inflammation of the lung tissue.

A complete blood count (CBC) test may show increased white blood cells, particularly eosinophils.

Chest x-ray usually shows abnormal shadows called infiltrates. They may disappear with time or reappear in different areas of the lung.

A bronchoscopy with washing usually shows a large number of eosinophils.

A procedure that removes the stomach contents (gastric lavage) may show signs of the ascaris worm or another parasite.

Treatment

If you are allergic to a medicine, your provider may tell you to stop taking it. Never stop taking a medicine without first talking with your provider.

If the condition is due to an infection, you may be treated with an antibiotic or antiparasitic medicine.

Sometimes, anti-inflammatory medicines called corticosteroids are given, especially if you have aspergillosis.

Outlook (Prognosis)

The disease often goes away without treatment. If treatment is needed, the response is usually good. But, the disease can come back, especially if the condition does not have a specific cause and needs to be treated with corticosteroids.

Possible Complications

A rare complication of simple pulmonary eosinophilia is a severe type of pneumonia called acute idiopathic eosinophilic pneumonia.

When to Contact a Medical Professional

See your provider if you have symptoms that may be linked with this disorder.

Prevention

This is a rare disorder. Many times, the cause cannot be found. Minimizing exposure to possible risk factors, such as certain medicines or parasites, may reduce the chance of developing this disorder.

References

Cottin V, Cordier J-F. Eosinophilic lung diseases. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst JD, et al, eds. Murray and Nadel's Textbook of Respiratory Medicine. 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 68.

Kim K, Weiss LM, Tanowitz HB. Parasitic infections. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst JD, et al, eds. Murray and Nadel's Textbook of Respiratory Medicine. 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 39.

Klion AD, Weller PF. Eosinophilia and eosinophil-related disorders. In: Adkinson NF, Bochner BS, Burks AW, et al, eds. Middleton's Allergy: Principles and Practice. 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap 75.

  • Lungs

    Lungs - illustration

    The major features of the lungs include the bronchi, the bronchioles and the alveoli. The alveoli are the microscopic blood vessel-lined sacks in which oxygen and carbon dioxide gas are exchanged.

    Lungs

    illustration

  • Respiratory system

    Respiratory system - illustration

    Air is breathed in through the nasal passageways, travels through the trachea and bronchi to the lungs.

    Respiratory system

    illustration

    • Lungs

      Lungs - illustration

      The major features of the lungs include the bronchi, the bronchioles and the alveoli. The alveoli are the microscopic blood vessel-lined sacks in which oxygen and carbon dioxide gas are exchanged.

      Lungs

      illustration

    • Respiratory system

      Respiratory system - illustration

      Air is breathed in through the nasal passageways, travels through the trachea and bronchi to the lungs.

      Respiratory system

      illustration

     

    Review Date: 5/21/2017

    Reviewed By: Denis Hadjiliadis, MD, MHS, Paul F. Harron, Jr. Associate Professor of Medicine, Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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