Carotid artery disease

Carotid stenosis; Stenosis - carotid; Stroke - carotid artery; TIA - carotid artery

Carotid artery disease occurs when the carotid arteries become narrowed or blocked. The carotid arteries provide part of the main blood supply to your brain. They are located on each side of your neck. You can feel their pulse under your jawline.

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  • Stent - Animation

    Stent

    Animation

  • Stent - Animation

    If you have a blocked artery in your heart, legs, or neck, you may need a stent to keep your blood flowing to prevent serious problems. Let's talk today about stents. A stent is a tiny tube we place in an artery, blood vessel, or other duct (such as the one that carries urine) to hold the tubes open. A stent is left in permanently. Most stents are made of metal or plastic mesh-like material. Stent grafts made of fabric are often used in larger arteries. Stents are used to treat a variety of artery and other problems. Your doctor will make a small cut in a blood vessel in your groin and thread a thin, flexible tube called a catheter to the place in your body where you need a stent. In the heart, a fatty substance called plaque can build up inside the coronary arteries. Plaque narrows the arteries, reducing the flow of oxygen-rich blood to the heart. One stent, called an intraluminal coronary artery stent, is a small, self-expanding, metal mesh-like tube that is placed inside a coronary artery after balloon angiography. This stent prevents the artery from re-closing. Another stent is coated with medicine that helps further prevent an artery from re-closing. In the carotid arteries, which are on both sides of your neck, plaque can build up and slow the flow of blood to your brain. Stents can keep the carotid arteries open. Stents can also open up narrow arteries in your legs caused by peripheral arterial disease. They're also used to treat an abdominal aortic aneurysm, which is when the large blood vessel that supplies blood to your abdomen, pelvis, and legs becomes abnormally large and balloons. After a stent procedure, your doctor will probably recommend that you take aspirin and another anti-clotting medication to prevent blood clots from forming in the stent. Make sure that you talk to your doctor, before getting a stent, about the risks associated with placing a stent to treat your condition, such as tissue growing around the area where the stent was placed.

  • Arterial tear in internal carotid artery

    Arterial tear in internal carotid artery

    Cholesterol may build-up in the lining of an internal carotid artery.

    Arterial tear in internal carotid artery

    illustration

  • Atherosclerosis of internal carotid artery

    Atherosclerosis of internal carotid artery

    The build-up of plaque in the internal carotid artery may lead to narrowing and irregularity of the artery's lumen, preventing proper blood flow to the brain. More commonly, as the narrowing worsens, pieces of plaque in the internal carotid artery can break free, travel to the brain and block blood vessels that supply blood to the brain. This leads to stroke, with possible paralysis or other deficits.

    Atherosclerosis of internal carotid artery

    illustration

  • Carotid artery anatomy

    Carotid artery anatomy

    There are four carotid arteries, two on each side of the neck: right and left internal carotid arteries, and right and left external carotid arteries. The carotid arteries deliver oxygen-rich blood from the heart to the head and brain.

    Carotid artery anatomy

    illustration

  • Coronary artery disease

    Coronary artery disease

    The coronary arteries supply blood to the heart muscle itself. Blood supply through these arteries is critical for the heart. Coronary artery disease usually results from the build-up of fatty material and plaque, a condition called atherosclerosis. As the coronary arteries narrow, the flow of blood to the heart can slow or stop, causing chest pain (stable angina), shortness of breath, heart attack, or other symptoms.

    Coronary artery disease

    illustration

  • Coronary artery disease

    Coronary artery disease

    The right coronary artery supplies blood from the aorta to the right side of the heart.

    Coronary artery disease

    illustration

  • Carotid duplex

    Carotid duplex

    Carotid duplex is an ultrasound procedure performed to assess blood flow through the carotid artery to the brain. High-frequency sound waves are directed from a hand-held transducer probe to the area. These waves bounce off the arterial structures and produce a 2-dimensional image on a monitor, which will make obstructions or narrowing of the arteries visible.

    Carotid duplex

    illustration

  • Carotid dissection

    Carotid dissection

    Stroke is defined as a loss of brain function due to blocked blood circulation to the brain. Strokes may be caused by a narrowing, obstruction, or leak in the lining of the carotid. This leaking of blood into the artery wall (dissection) may cause a clot to form, reducing blood flow and raising the risk of a stroke. The leak may arise from an injury to the neck, which means stroke secondary to carotid dissection may occur in young people as well as older people.

    Carotid dissection

    illustration

  • Carotid stenosis, x-ray of the left artery

    Carotid stenosis, x-ray of the left artery

    A carotid arteriogram is an x-ray study designed to determine if there is narrowing or other abnormality in the carotid artery, a main artery to the brain. This is an angiogram of the left common carotid artery (both front-to-back and side views) showing a severe narrowing (stenosis) of the internal carotid artery just beyond the division of the common carotid artery into the internal and external branches.

    Carotid stenosis, x-ray of the left artery

    illustration

  • Carotid stenosis, x-ray of the right artery

    Carotid stenosis, x-ray of the right artery

    This is an angiogram of the right carotid artery showing a severe narrowing (stenosis) of the internal carotid artery just past the carotid fork. There is enlargement of the artery or ulceration in the area after the stenosis in this close-up film. Note the narrowed segment toward the bottom of the picture.

    Carotid stenosis, x-ray of the right artery

    illustration

  • Carotid artery surgery - series

    Carotid artery surgery - series

    Presentation

  • Stent - Animation

    Stent

    Animation

  • Stent - Animation

    If you have a blocked artery in your heart, legs, or neck, you may need a stent to keep your blood flowing to prevent serious problems. Let's talk today about stents. A stent is a tiny tube we place in an artery, blood vessel, or other duct (such as the one that carries urine) to hold the tubes open. A stent is left in permanently. Most stents are made of metal or plastic mesh-like material. Stent grafts made of fabric are often used in larger arteries. Stents are used to treat a variety of artery and other problems. Your doctor will make a small cut in a blood vessel in your groin and thread a thin, flexible tube called a catheter to the place in your body where you need a stent. In the heart, a fatty substance called plaque can build up inside the coronary arteries. Plaque narrows the arteries, reducing the flow of oxygen-rich blood to the heart. One stent, called an intraluminal coronary artery stent, is a small, self-expanding, metal mesh-like tube that is placed inside a coronary artery after balloon angiography. This stent prevents the artery from re-closing. Another stent is coated with medicine that helps further prevent an artery from re-closing. In the carotid arteries, which are on both sides of your neck, plaque can build up and slow the flow of blood to your brain. Stents can keep the carotid arteries open. Stents can also open up narrow arteries in your legs caused by peripheral arterial disease. They're also used to treat an abdominal aortic aneurysm, which is when the large blood vessel that supplies blood to your abdomen, pelvis, and legs becomes abnormally large and balloons. After a stent procedure, your doctor will probably recommend that you take aspirin and another anti-clotting medication to prevent blood clots from forming in the stent. Make sure that you talk to your doctor, before getting a stent, about the risks associated with placing a stent to treat your condition, such as tissue growing around the area where the stent was placed.

  • Arterial tear in internal carotid artery

    Arterial tear in internal carotid artery

    Cholesterol may build-up in the lining of an internal carotid artery.

    Arterial tear in internal carotid artery

    illustration

  • Atherosclerosis of internal carotid artery

    Atherosclerosis of internal carotid artery

    The build-up of plaque in the internal carotid artery may lead to narrowing and irregularity of the artery's lumen, preventing proper blood flow to the brain. More commonly, as the narrowing worsens, pieces of plaque in the internal carotid artery can break free, travel to the brain and block blood vessels that supply blood to the brain. This leads to stroke, with possible paralysis or other deficits.

    Atherosclerosis of internal carotid artery

    illustration

  • Carotid artery anatomy

    Carotid artery anatomy

    There are four carotid arteries, two on each side of the neck: right and left internal carotid arteries, and right and left external carotid arteries. The carotid arteries deliver oxygen-rich blood from the heart to the head and brain.

    Carotid artery anatomy

    illustration

  • Coronary artery disease

    Coronary artery disease

    The coronary arteries supply blood to the heart muscle itself. Blood supply through these arteries is critical for the heart. Coronary artery disease usually results from the build-up of fatty material and plaque, a condition called atherosclerosis. As the coronary arteries narrow, the flow of blood to the heart can slow or stop, causing chest pain (stable angina), shortness of breath, heart attack, or other symptoms.

    Coronary artery disease

    illustration

  • Coronary artery disease

    Coronary artery disease

    The right coronary artery supplies blood from the aorta to the right side of the heart.

    Coronary artery disease

    illustration

  • Carotid duplex

    Carotid duplex

    Carotid duplex is an ultrasound procedure performed to assess blood flow through the carotid artery to the brain. High-frequency sound waves are directed from a hand-held transducer probe to the area. These waves bounce off the arterial structures and produce a 2-dimensional image on a monitor, which will make obstructions or narrowing of the arteries visible.

    Carotid duplex

    illustration

  • Carotid dissection

    Carotid dissection

    Stroke is defined as a loss of brain function due to blocked blood circulation to the brain. Strokes may be caused by a narrowing, obstruction, or leak in the lining of the carotid. This leaking of blood into the artery wall (dissection) may cause a clot to form, reducing blood flow and raising the risk of a stroke. The leak may arise from an injury to the neck, which means stroke secondary to carotid dissection may occur in young people as well as older people.

    Carotid dissection

    illustration

  • Carotid stenosis, x-ray of the left artery

    Carotid stenosis, x-ray of the left artery

    A carotid arteriogram is an x-ray study designed to determine if there is narrowing or other abnormality in the carotid artery, a main artery to the brain. This is an angiogram of the left common carotid artery (both front-to-back and side views) showing a severe narrowing (stenosis) of the internal carotid artery just beyond the division of the common carotid artery into the internal and external branches.

    Carotid stenosis, x-ray of the left artery

    illustration

  • Carotid stenosis, x-ray of the right artery

    Carotid stenosis, x-ray of the right artery

    This is an angiogram of the right carotid artery showing a severe narrowing (stenosis) of the internal carotid artery just past the carotid fork. There is enlargement of the artery or ulceration in the area after the stenosis in this close-up film. Note the narrowed segment toward the bottom of the picture.

    Carotid stenosis, x-ray of the right artery

    illustration

  • Carotid artery surgery - series

    Carotid artery surgery - series

    Presentation

Review Date: 8/7/2017

Reviewed By: Amit M. Shelat, DO, FACP, Attending Neurologist and Assistant Professor of Clinical Neurology, SUNY Stony Brook, School of Medicine, Stony Brook, NY. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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