Health Encyclopedia

 
  • CT scan

    CT scan

    CT stands for computerized tomography. In this procedure, a thin X-ray beam is rotated around the area of the body to be visualized. Using very complicated mathematical processes called algorithms, the computer is able to generate a 3-D image of a section through the body. CT scans are very detailed and provide excellent information for the physician.

    CT scan

    illustration

  • Head CT

    Head CT

    CT stands for computerized tomography. In this procedure, a thin X-ray beam is rotated around the area of the body to be visualized. Using very complicated mathematical processes called algorithms, the computer is able to generate a 3-D image of a section through the body. CT scans are very detailed and provide excellent information for the physician.

    Head CT

    illustration

  • Bone biopsy

    Bone biopsy

    A bone biopsy is performed by making a small incision into the skin. A biopsy needle retrieves a sample of bone and it is sent for examination. The most common reasons for bone lesion biopsy are to distinguish between benign and malignant bone tumors, and to identify other bone abnormalities. Bone biopsy may also be performed to determine the cause of bone pain and tenderness.

    Bone biopsy

    illustration

  • Rectal biopsy

    Rectal biopsy

    Rectal biopsy can be used to determine the cause of blood, mucus, or pus in the stool. Rectal biopsy can also confirm findings of another test or x-rays, or take a biopsy of a growth found in the colon.

    Rectal biopsy

    illustration

  • Muscle biopsy

    Muscle biopsy

    A muscle biopsy involves removal of a plug of tissue usually by a needle to be later used for examination. Sometimes more than one needle insertion may be needed to obtain a large enough specimen. If there is a patchy condition expected an open biopsy may be used. Open biopsy involves a small incision through the skin and into the muscle, so that a sample of muscle tissue can be removed from the affected area. There may be some slight bruising or bleeding at the site but the risks are minimal with the procedure.

    Muscle biopsy

    illustration

  • Mucosal biopsy

    Mucosal biopsy

    Mucosal skin biopsy is the removal of a small piece of skin or mucous membrane. The sample can be retrieved in several ways: a shave biopsy (scraping or shaving a thin layer), a punch biopsy (using a needle or punch to obtain a small, but deeper, sample), or an excision of tissue (cutting to remove a piece of tissue). The sample is sent to the laboratory to isolate and identify organisms that cause infection.

    Mucosal biopsy

    illustration

  • Sentinel node biopsy

    Sentinel node biopsy

    Sentinel node biopsy is a technique which helps determine if a cancer has spread (metastasized), or is contained locally. When a cancer has been detected, often the next step is to find the lymph node closest to the tumor site and retrieve it for analysis. The concept of the "sentinel" node, or the first node to drain the area of the cancer, allows a more accurate staging of the cancer, and leaves unaffected nodes behind to continue the important job of draining fluids. The procedure involves the injection of a dye (sometimes mildly radioactive) to pinpoint the lymph node which is closest to the cancer site. Sentinel node biopsy is used to stage many kinds of cancer, including lung and skin (melanoma).

    Sentinel node biopsy

    illustration

  • Pleural biopsy

    Pleural biopsy

    In a pleural biopsy, a small piece of pleural tissue in the chest is removed with a needle. The biopsy may distinguish between a cancerous and noncancerous disease. It also can help to detect whether a viral, fungal or parasitic disease is present.

    Pleural biopsy

    illustration

  • Testicular biopsy

    Testicular biopsy

    Testicular biopsy is a procedure in which a small portion of testicle is removed for examination. The biopsy is performed by creating a small incision in the skin of the scrotum. A small piece of the testicle tissue is removed through the incision by snipping the sample off with small scissors. The test is usually performed when a semen analysis suggests that there is abnormal sperm, and other tests have not determined the cause. It may also be performed when testicular self-examination has revealed a lump.

    Testicular biopsy

    illustration

  • Salivary gland biopsy

    Salivary gland biopsy

    A small piece of salivary gland is removed for examination by needle biopsy if abnormal lumps are found, or to test for Sjogren syndrome. The biopsy needle removes a small "core" of gland tissue which is sent to the laboratory for analysis.

    Salivary gland biopsy

    illustration

    • CT scan

      CT scan

      CT stands for computerized tomography. In this procedure, a thin X-ray beam is rotated around the area of the body to be visualized. Using very complicated mathematical processes called algorithms, the computer is able to generate a 3-D image of a section through the body. CT scans are very detailed and provide excellent information for the physician.

      CT scan

      illustration

    • Head CT

      Head CT

      CT stands for computerized tomography. In this procedure, a thin X-ray beam is rotated around the area of the body to be visualized. Using very complicated mathematical processes called algorithms, the computer is able to generate a 3-D image of a section through the body. CT scans are very detailed and provide excellent information for the physician.

      Head CT

      illustration

    • Bone biopsy

      Bone biopsy

      A bone biopsy is performed by making a small incision into the skin. A biopsy needle retrieves a sample of bone and it is sent for examination. The most common reasons for bone lesion biopsy are to distinguish between benign and malignant bone tumors, and to identify other bone abnormalities. Bone biopsy may also be performed to determine the cause of bone pain and tenderness.

      Bone biopsy

      illustration

    • Rectal biopsy

      Rectal biopsy

      Rectal biopsy can be used to determine the cause of blood, mucus, or pus in the stool. Rectal biopsy can also confirm findings of another test or x-rays, or take a biopsy of a growth found in the colon.

      Rectal biopsy

      illustration

    • Muscle biopsy

      Muscle biopsy

      A muscle biopsy involves removal of a plug of tissue usually by a needle to be later used for examination. Sometimes more than one needle insertion may be needed to obtain a large enough specimen. If there is a patchy condition expected an open biopsy may be used. Open biopsy involves a small incision through the skin and into the muscle, so that a sample of muscle tissue can be removed from the affected area. There may be some slight bruising or bleeding at the site but the risks are minimal with the procedure.

      Muscle biopsy

      illustration

    • Mucosal biopsy

      Mucosal biopsy

      Mucosal skin biopsy is the removal of a small piece of skin or mucous membrane. The sample can be retrieved in several ways: a shave biopsy (scraping or shaving a thin layer), a punch biopsy (using a needle or punch to obtain a small, but deeper, sample), or an excision of tissue (cutting to remove a piece of tissue). The sample is sent to the laboratory to isolate and identify organisms that cause infection.

      Mucosal biopsy

      illustration

    • Sentinel node biopsy

      Sentinel node biopsy

      Sentinel node biopsy is a technique which helps determine if a cancer has spread (metastasized), or is contained locally. When a cancer has been detected, often the next step is to find the lymph node closest to the tumor site and retrieve it for analysis. The concept of the "sentinel" node, or the first node to drain the area of the cancer, allows a more accurate staging of the cancer, and leaves unaffected nodes behind to continue the important job of draining fluids. The procedure involves the injection of a dye (sometimes mildly radioactive) to pinpoint the lymph node which is closest to the cancer site. Sentinel node biopsy is used to stage many kinds of cancer, including lung and skin (melanoma).

      Sentinel node biopsy

      illustration

    • Pleural biopsy

      Pleural biopsy

      In a pleural biopsy, a small piece of pleural tissue in the chest is removed with a needle. The biopsy may distinguish between a cancerous and noncancerous disease. It also can help to detect whether a viral, fungal or parasitic disease is present.

      Pleural biopsy

      illustration

    • Testicular biopsy

      Testicular biopsy

      Testicular biopsy is a procedure in which a small portion of testicle is removed for examination. The biopsy is performed by creating a small incision in the skin of the scrotum. A small piece of the testicle tissue is removed through the incision by snipping the sample off with small scissors. The test is usually performed when a semen analysis suggests that there is abnormal sperm, and other tests have not determined the cause. It may also be performed when testicular self-examination has revealed a lump.

      Testicular biopsy

      illustration

    • Salivary gland biopsy

      Salivary gland biopsy

      A small piece of salivary gland is removed for examination by needle biopsy if abnormal lumps are found, or to test for Sjogren syndrome. The biopsy needle removes a small "core" of gland tissue which is sent to the laboratory for analysis.

      Salivary gland biopsy

      illustration

     
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    Review Date: 12/13/2019

    Reviewed By: Todd Gersten, MD, Hematology/Oncology, Florida Cancer Specialists & Research Institute, Wellington, FL. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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