Health Encyclopedia

 
  • Biopsy catheter

    Biopsy catheter

    When a small piece of heart muscle tissue is needed for examination, a heart biopsy can be performed. A catheter is carefully threaded into an artery or vein to gain access into the heart. A bioptome (catheter with jaws in its tip) is then introduced. Once the bioptome is in place, three to five small pieces of tissue from the heart muscle are removed. The test is performed routinely after heart transplantation to detect potential rejection. It may also be performed when cardiomyopathy, myocarditis, cardiac amyloidosis, or other disorders are suspected.

    Biopsy catheter

    illustration

  • Needle biopsy of the breast

    Needle biopsy of the breast

    A needle biopsy is performed under local anesthesia. Simple aspirations are performed with a small gauge needle to attempt to draw fluid from lumps that are thought to be cysts. Fine needle biopsy uses a larger needle to make multiple passes through a lump, drawing out tissue and fluid. Withdrawn fluid and tissue is further evaluated to determine if there are cancerous cells present.

    Needle biopsy of the breast

    illustration

  • Open biopsy of the breast

    Open biopsy of the breast

    An open biopsy can be performed under local or general anesthesia and will leave a small scar. Prior to surgery, a radiologist often first marks the lump with a wire, making it easier for the surgeon to find.

    Open biopsy of the breast

    illustration

  • Sentinel node biopsy

    Sentinel node biopsy

    Sentinel node biopsy is a technique which helps determine if a cancer has spread (metastasized), or is contained locally. When a cancer has been detected, often the next step is to find the lymph node closest to the tumor site and retrieve it for analysis. The concept of the "sentinel" node, or the first node to drain the area of the cancer, allows a more accurate staging of the cancer, and leaves unaffected nodes behind to continue the important job of draining fluids. The procedure involves the injection of a dye (sometimes mildly radioactive) to pinpoint the lymph node which is closest to the cancer site. Sentinel node biopsy is used to stage many kinds of cancer, including lung and skin (melanoma).

    Sentinel node biopsy

    illustration

  • Mucosal biopsy

    Mucosal biopsy

    Mucosal skin biopsy is the removal of a small piece of skin or mucous membrane. The sample can be retrieved in several ways: a shave biopsy (scraping or shaving a thin layer), a punch biopsy (using a needle or punch to obtain a small, but deeper, sample), or an excision of tissue (cutting to remove a piece of tissue). The sample is sent to the laboratory to isolate and identify organisms that cause infection.

    Mucosal biopsy

    illustration

  • Incision for pleural tissue biopsy

    Incision for pleural tissue biopsy

    In an open pleural biopsy, a small piece of the pleural tissue is removed through a surgical incision in the chest. After the sample is obtained, a chest tube is placed and the incision is closed with stitches. Abnormal results may indicate tuberculosis, abnormal growths, viral, fungal, and parasitic diseases.

    Incision for pleural tissue biopsy

    illustration

  • Testicular biopsy

    Testicular biopsy

    Testicular biopsy is a procedure in which a small portion of testicle is removed for examination. The biopsy is performed by creating a small incision in the skin of the scrotum. A small piece of the testicle tissue is removed through the incision by snipping the sample off with small scissors. The test is usually performed when a semen analysis suggests that there is abnormal sperm, and other tests have not determined the cause. It may also be performed when testicular self-examination has revealed a lump.

    Testicular biopsy

    illustration

  • Rectal biopsy

    Rectal biopsy

    Rectal biopsy can be used to determine the cause of blood, mucus, or pus in the stool. Rectal biopsy can also confirm findings of another test or x-rays, or take a biopsy of a growth found in the colon.

    Rectal biopsy

    illustration

  • Nasal biopsy

    Nasal biopsy

    A nasal biopsy is a diagnostic procedure in which a small piece of tissue is removed from the mucosal lining of the nose. The biopsy is most often performed when abnormal tissue is observed during an examination of the nose, or when disorders affecting the nasal mucosal tissue are suspected.

    Nasal biopsy

    illustration

  • Pleural biopsy

    Pleural biopsy

    In a pleural biopsy, a small piece of pleural tissue in the chest is removed with a needle. The biopsy may distinguish between a cancerous and noncancerous disease. It also can help to detect whether a viral, fungal or parasitic disease is present.

    Pleural biopsy

    illustration

    • Biopsy catheter

      Biopsy catheter

      When a small piece of heart muscle tissue is needed for examination, a heart biopsy can be performed. A catheter is carefully threaded into an artery or vein to gain access into the heart. A bioptome (catheter with jaws in its tip) is then introduced. Once the bioptome is in place, three to five small pieces of tissue from the heart muscle are removed. The test is performed routinely after heart transplantation to detect potential rejection. It may also be performed when cardiomyopathy, myocarditis, cardiac amyloidosis, or other disorders are suspected.

      Biopsy catheter

      illustration

    • Needle biopsy of the breast

      Needle biopsy of the breast

      A needle biopsy is performed under local anesthesia. Simple aspirations are performed with a small gauge needle to attempt to draw fluid from lumps that are thought to be cysts. Fine needle biopsy uses a larger needle to make multiple passes through a lump, drawing out tissue and fluid. Withdrawn fluid and tissue is further evaluated to determine if there are cancerous cells present.

      Needle biopsy of the breast

      illustration

    • Open biopsy of the breast

      Open biopsy of the breast

      An open biopsy can be performed under local or general anesthesia and will leave a small scar. Prior to surgery, a radiologist often first marks the lump with a wire, making it easier for the surgeon to find.

      Open biopsy of the breast

      illustration

    • Sentinel node biopsy

      Sentinel node biopsy

      Sentinel node biopsy is a technique which helps determine if a cancer has spread (metastasized), or is contained locally. When a cancer has been detected, often the next step is to find the lymph node closest to the tumor site and retrieve it for analysis. The concept of the "sentinel" node, or the first node to drain the area of the cancer, allows a more accurate staging of the cancer, and leaves unaffected nodes behind to continue the important job of draining fluids. The procedure involves the injection of a dye (sometimes mildly radioactive) to pinpoint the lymph node which is closest to the cancer site. Sentinel node biopsy is used to stage many kinds of cancer, including lung and skin (melanoma).

      Sentinel node biopsy

      illustration

    • Mucosal biopsy

      Mucosal biopsy

      Mucosal skin biopsy is the removal of a small piece of skin or mucous membrane. The sample can be retrieved in several ways: a shave biopsy (scraping or shaving a thin layer), a punch biopsy (using a needle or punch to obtain a small, but deeper, sample), or an excision of tissue (cutting to remove a piece of tissue). The sample is sent to the laboratory to isolate and identify organisms that cause infection.

      Mucosal biopsy

      illustration

    • Incision for pleural tissue biopsy

      Incision for pleural tissue biopsy

      In an open pleural biopsy, a small piece of the pleural tissue is removed through a surgical incision in the chest. After the sample is obtained, a chest tube is placed and the incision is closed with stitches. Abnormal results may indicate tuberculosis, abnormal growths, viral, fungal, and parasitic diseases.

      Incision for pleural tissue biopsy

      illustration

    • Testicular biopsy

      Testicular biopsy

      Testicular biopsy is a procedure in which a small portion of testicle is removed for examination. The biopsy is performed by creating a small incision in the skin of the scrotum. A small piece of the testicle tissue is removed through the incision by snipping the sample off with small scissors. The test is usually performed when a semen analysis suggests that there is abnormal sperm, and other tests have not determined the cause. It may also be performed when testicular self-examination has revealed a lump.

      Testicular biopsy

      illustration

    • Rectal biopsy

      Rectal biopsy

      Rectal biopsy can be used to determine the cause of blood, mucus, or pus in the stool. Rectal biopsy can also confirm findings of another test or x-rays, or take a biopsy of a growth found in the colon.

      Rectal biopsy

      illustration

    • Nasal biopsy

      Nasal biopsy

      A nasal biopsy is a diagnostic procedure in which a small piece of tissue is removed from the mucosal lining of the nose. The biopsy is most often performed when abnormal tissue is observed during an examination of the nose, or when disorders affecting the nasal mucosal tissue are suspected.

      Nasal biopsy

      illustration

    • Pleural biopsy

      Pleural biopsy

      In a pleural biopsy, a small piece of pleural tissue in the chest is removed with a needle. The biopsy may distinguish between a cancerous and noncancerous disease. It also can help to detect whether a viral, fungal or parasitic disease is present.

      Pleural biopsy

      illustration

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    Review Date: 9/3/2018

    Reviewed By: Debra G. Wechter, MD, FACS, general surgery practice specializing in breast cancer, Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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