Health Encyclopedia

Dizziness

Lightheadedness - dizzy; Loss of balance; Vertigo

Dizziness is a term that is often used to describe 2 different symptoms: lightheadedness and vertigo. Lightheadedness is a feeling that you might faint. Vertigo is a feeling that you are spinning or moving, or that the world is spinning around you. Vertigo-associated disorders is a related topic.

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  • Lyme disease - Animation

    Lyme disease

    Animation

  • Lyme disease - Animation

    Having a tick attached to your body isn't just getting a little too close to nature. The tick can make you seriously ill with Lyme disease. Lyme disease is caused by bacteria called Borrelia burgdorferi. Blacklegged ticks carry these bacteria. The ticks pick up the bacteria when they bite mice or deer that are infected with Lyme disease. You can get the disease if you are bitten by an infected tick, mostly in northeastern states and on the West Coast. The good news is that usually a tick has to be attached to your body for 24 to 36 hours to infect you. The bad news is that blacklegged ticks are so small they're almost impossible to see. Many people with Lyme disease never even see a tick on their body. But most people bitten by a tick do NOT get Lyme disease. So, how do you know for sure that you have Lyme disease?The flu-like symptoms of Lyme disease usually start days or weeks after you've been bitten. You might have Itching all over your body; Chills, fever, and light headedness; Or perhaps a Headache, muscle pain, and a stiff neck. You'll probably see a "bull's eye" rash on your body. It can get pretty big. After a few weeks, the muscles in your face might feel weak or even paralyzed. Your knees and other joints may swell and hurt. You might even notice your heart skipping some beats. Eventually, your muscles might move strangely, you may feel numbness or tingling, and you may start to have trouble speaking. A doctor will test your blood for antibodies that are trying to fight the bacteria in your blood. One of these tests is called the ELISA test, and you'll often have a second test called the Western blot test to confirm you have Lyme disease. To treat Lyme disease, you may need to take antibiotics for up to a month. Pain medicines from the drug store can help soothe your joint stiffness. If it's caught early, Lyme disease is pretty easily treated. Without treatment, you can have heart, muscle, and even nerve problems. So the next time you're out in the woods or high grass, wear protective clothing, and do check yourself for ticks once you get home.

  • Iron deficiency anemia - Animation

    Iron deficiency anemia

    Animation

  • Iron deficiency anemia - Animation

    To be anemic means that there aren't enough red blood cells flowing throughout your body. Red blood cells carry oxygen throughout your body, so if you're anemic, everything from your brain, to your heart, to your muscles aren't getting enough oxygen to run properly. Iron is a key part of red blood cells. When your body doesn't have enough iron, it'll make fewer red blood cells or make cells that are just too small. If you lose enough iron, you'll wind up with iron deficiency anemia - the most common form of anemia. So, what causes iron deficiency anemia?There are basically three main ways you can become iron deficient. First, bleeding can cause you to lose more blood cells and iron than your body can replace. Bleeding due to ulcers, cancers, taking aspirin or other medicines can cause anemia. In women, this can happen because of heavy or frequent menstrual periods. The second way, your body isn't properly absorbing iron, perhaps, due to an intestinal disease. Some surgeries, like gastric bypass, can lead to anemia. You can also develop anemia if you take too many antacids that contain calcium. Lastly and much less common, is because of inadequate iron in your diet. We see this in strict vegetarians and older folks who simply just don't eat enough food. In many cases, mild iron deficiency anemia comes on so gradually that you may not even know you're anemic. Symptoms of mild anemia are subtle and include: feeling grumpy, weak or tired more often than usual and getting headaches or perhaps having problems concentrating. But as the anemia gets worse, you may develop: a blue color to the whites of your eyes, light-headedness when you go to stand up and you may look pale or experience shortness of breath. To find out if you've got iron-deficiency anemia. See your doctor; your doctor will start with a Complete Blood Count or CBC test. That'll tell you and your doctor your white, red blood cell and platelet counts. If you're anemic and have small red blood cells, that suggests iron deficiency anemia, so iron studies like serum iron, total iron binding capacity and ferritin level tests should be done. So, what steps can you take -- It's important that your diet include enough iron. Red meat, chicken, turkey. liver, and egg yolks are important sources of iron. Flour, bread, and some cereals are fortified with iron. Sometimes people with anemia take iron supplements to build up iron stores in their bodies. But the thing is - It's not enough just to take extra iron at your doctor's direction. . . Your doctor needs to find out WHY you've got iron deficiency anemia and treat that underlying cause.

  • Polymorphic light eruption on the arm

    Polymorphic light eruption on the arm

    The cause of polymorphous light eruption is unknown. It usually appears 1 to 2 days following exposure to sunlight and may last up to one week. It is more common during adolescence and young adulthood, and occurs more frequently in females. It appears as recurrent redness (erythematous) and/or blistered patches (plaques). It may be an inherited disease in certain Native American groups.

    Polymorphic light eruption on the arm

    illustration

  • Lyme disease - Animation

    Lyme disease

    Animation

  • Lyme disease - Animation

    Having a tick attached to your body isn't just getting a little too close to nature. The tick can make you seriously ill with Lyme disease. Lyme disease is caused by bacteria called Borrelia burgdorferi. Blacklegged ticks carry these bacteria. The ticks pick up the bacteria when they bite mice or deer that are infected with Lyme disease. You can get the disease if you are bitten by an infected tick, mostly in northeastern states and on the West Coast. The good news is that usually a tick has to be attached to your body for 24 to 36 hours to infect you. The bad news is that blacklegged ticks are so small they're almost impossible to see. Many people with Lyme disease never even see a tick on their body. But most people bitten by a tick do NOT get Lyme disease. So, how do you know for sure that you have Lyme disease?The flu-like symptoms of Lyme disease usually start days or weeks after you've been bitten. You might have Itching all over your body; Chills, fever, and light headedness; Or perhaps a Headache, muscle pain, and a stiff neck. You'll probably see a "bull's eye" rash on your body. It can get pretty big. After a few weeks, the muscles in your face might feel weak or even paralyzed. Your knees and other joints may swell and hurt. You might even notice your heart skipping some beats. Eventually, your muscles might move strangely, you may feel numbness or tingling, and you may start to have trouble speaking. A doctor will test your blood for antibodies that are trying to fight the bacteria in your blood. One of these tests is called the ELISA test, and you'll often have a second test called the Western blot test to confirm you have Lyme disease. To treat Lyme disease, you may need to take antibiotics for up to a month. Pain medicines from the drug store can help soothe your joint stiffness. If it's caught early, Lyme disease is pretty easily treated. Without treatment, you can have heart, muscle, and even nerve problems. So the next time you're out in the woods or high grass, wear protective clothing, and do check yourself for ticks once you get home.

  • Iron deficiency anemia - Animation

    Iron deficiency anemia

    Animation

  • Iron deficiency anemia - Animation

    To be anemic means that there aren't enough red blood cells flowing throughout your body. Red blood cells carry oxygen throughout your body, so if you're anemic, everything from your brain, to your heart, to your muscles aren't getting enough oxygen to run properly. Iron is a key part of red blood cells. When your body doesn't have enough iron, it'll make fewer red blood cells or make cells that are just too small. If you lose enough iron, you'll wind up with iron deficiency anemia - the most common form of anemia. So, what causes iron deficiency anemia?There are basically three main ways you can become iron deficient. First, bleeding can cause you to lose more blood cells and iron than your body can replace. Bleeding due to ulcers, cancers, taking aspirin or other medicines can cause anemia. In women, this can happen because of heavy or frequent menstrual periods. The second way, your body isn't properly absorbing iron, perhaps, due to an intestinal disease. Some surgeries, like gastric bypass, can lead to anemia. You can also develop anemia if you take too many antacids that contain calcium. Lastly and much less common, is because of inadequate iron in your diet. We see this in strict vegetarians and older folks who simply just don't eat enough food. In many cases, mild iron deficiency anemia comes on so gradually that you may not even know you're anemic. Symptoms of mild anemia are subtle and include: feeling grumpy, weak or tired more often than usual and getting headaches or perhaps having problems concentrating. But as the anemia gets worse, you may develop: a blue color to the whites of your eyes, light-headedness when you go to stand up and you may look pale or experience shortness of breath. To find out if you've got iron-deficiency anemia. See your doctor; your doctor will start with a Complete Blood Count or CBC test. That'll tell you and your doctor your white, red blood cell and platelet counts. If you're anemic and have small red blood cells, that suggests iron deficiency anemia, so iron studies like serum iron, total iron binding capacity and ferritin level tests should be done. So, what steps can you take -- It's important that your diet include enough iron. Red meat, chicken, turkey. liver, and egg yolks are important sources of iron. Flour, bread, and some cereals are fortified with iron. Sometimes people with anemia take iron supplements to build up iron stores in their bodies. But the thing is - It's not enough just to take extra iron at your doctor's direction. . . Your doctor needs to find out WHY you've got iron deficiency anemia and treat that underlying cause.

  • Polymorphic light eruption on the arm

    Polymorphic light eruption on the arm

    The cause of polymorphous light eruption is unknown. It usually appears 1 to 2 days following exposure to sunlight and may last up to one week. It is more common during adolescence and young adulthood, and occurs more frequently in females. It appears as recurrent redness (erythematous) and/or blistered patches (plaques). It may be an inherited disease in certain Native American groups.

    Polymorphic light eruption on the arm

    illustration

Dizziness

Lightheadedness - dizzy; Loss of balance; Vertigo

Dizziness is a term that is often used to describe 2 different symptoms: lightheadedness and vertigo. Lightheadedness is a feeling that you might faint. Vertigo is a feeling that you are spinning or moving, or that the world is spinning around you. Vertigo-associated disorders is a related topic.

Read Full Article

 
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Dizziness

Lightheadedness - dizzy; Loss of balance; Vertigo

Dizziness is a term that is often used to describe 2 different symptoms: lightheadedness and vertigo. Lightheadedness is a feeling that you might faint. Vertigo is a feeling that you are spinning or moving, or that the world is spinning around you. Vertigo-associated disorders is a related topic.

Read Full Article

 

Review Date: 5/13/2019

Reviewed By: Linda J. Vorvick, MD, Clinical Associate Professor, Department of Family Medicine, UW Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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